Home

What's New

Photo of the Month

Minerd.com Blog

Biographies

Reunion 2015

Interconnectedness

Cousin Voices

Honor Roll

In Lasting Memory

In the News

Our Mission and Values

Annual Review 2015

Favorite Links

Contact Us

 

Johann 'Richard' Gaumer
(1779-1840)

 

Johann "Richard" Gaumer was born on June 7, 1779 or on Dec. 16, 1779 at Oldtown, MD, or in Pennsylvania, the son of Johannes "John" and Albertina Christina (Dean) Gaumer. The later date may be a baptism date.

In about 1808, he married Mary Ann (?) (1781-1843). They had two known sons Samuel Gaumer and Daniel Gaumer.

They resided in Southampton Township, Somerset County, PA.

Johann Richard died in Southampton on Feb. 4, 1840 at the age of 60 years, seven months and 28 days.

Mary outlived him by three years, and passed away on April 21, 1843. Her age at death was 62 years, three months and 11 days.

They are buried at Getz Cemetery in Southampton. Their graves were included in a 1934 survey by the Works Progress Administration [link]. In the 1930s, the cemetery was located on the farm of Irvin Troutman, east of the buildings about 20 rods on top of a knoll in the field." When the founder of this website visited Getz in September 2016, no markers for Richard or Mary Ann were found.

Their families are spelled out in the 1991 book The Reiber Genealogy: The Descendants of Jacob Reiber, the Immigrant Ancestor of Sandhofen, Germany, 1727-1810, and Later of Lehigh County and York County, Pennsylvania, authored by John Raymond and Edith Fae ( Boyer) Reiber ( 625 pages).

 

The Gaumers rest beneath the pines on this knoll in Southampton Township

 

~ Son Samuel Gaumer ~

Son Samuel Gaumer (1811- ? ) was born in Southampton Township, Somerset County. 

In about 1831, when he was age 20 and she 19, Samuel married Susanna Korns (1812-1854), born on July 17, 1812, the daughter of Daniel and Elizabeth (Reiber) Korns of Southampton Township. The Gaumer and Korn families were close, with many marriages between them. 

The Gaumers went on to produce 10 children -- among the known names are Lydia A. Gaumer, Emanuel Gaumer, Catharine Gaumer, Rosanna "Anna" Gaumer, Levi Gaumer, Samuel K Gaumer, Matilda Gaumer, Amanda Gaumer and Richard Henry Gaumer.

 

Somerset Herald, Sept. 15, 1846

Library of Congress

News articles and advertisements in the Somerset Herald circa 1845-1846 show that Samuel was active and engaged in his community. In December 1845, he was appointed as a delegate to represent Somerset County in a convention to be held at the state capitol of Harrisburg the following month for the purpose of persuading legislators to support "a continuous Rail Road from Philadelphia to Pittsburg," reported the Somerset Herald, "and for the extension of the B. & O. Rail Road from Cumberland to Pittsburgh." Then in August-September-October 1846, Herald ads show that Samuel at age 35 was politically minded, well connected and interested in pursuing election as county commissioner. He wrote: "To the Free and Independent Voters of Somerset County. Fellow Citizens: At the solicitation of numerous friends throughout the county, I offer myself to your consideration as a Candidate for Commissioner at the ensuing General Election, and respectfully solicit your suffrages. if elected, I will discharge the duties of the office with impartiality. SAMUEL GAUMER. Southampton tp, Aug. 25, '46".

Then in 1849, he campaigned for auditor of the township, with David Younkin of Milford Township running for coroner.

When the federal census was taken in 1850, the Gaumers dwelled in Southampton Township, next door to Samuel's brother David (or "Daniel"), his wife Elizabeth and their large brood. Samuel, along with Charles Uhl, served as a member of the Lutheran Church, which shared a building with the German Reformed Church. In June 1840, an act was passed in the General Assembly of Pennsylvania incorporating the Lutheran and German Reformed Churches at Wellersburg, Somerset County. They were instructed to serve as trustees "for one year and until others be chosen, in such manner, time and place as shall be determined by a majority of the members of said church."

The Gaumers moved to Iowa in about 1854 or '55, and settled in Hartford Township, Iowa County. He rented a farm from G.W. Wilson, who in 1855 had broken 80 acres of prairie on what became the town of Victor. 

Susanna passed away on Feb. 1, 1854, after 23 years of marriage. 

Samuel survived her by 11 years. In 1860, the federal census shows him and his brood of seven children ranging in age from 25 to 9 in Victor, Warren Township, Poweshiek County. In 1864, continuing his interest in public service, Samuel served as supervisor of the county. He died in Victor on Feb. 25, 1865.

This family is named in the 1949 book The Genealogy of Michael Korns Sr. of Somerset County, Pennsylvania, authored by Charles Byron Korns (Berlin Publishing Company, 262 pages). Samuel also is named in James C. Dinwiddie's book History of Iowa County, Iowa, and Its People, Vol. 1.

Daughter Lydia A. Gaumer (1832- ? ) was born on Jan. 29, 1832 in or near Southampton Township, Somerset County.

Son Emanuel Gaumer (1833- ? ) was born on Sept. 8, 1833 in or near Southampton Township, Somerset County.

Daughter Catharine "Kate" Gaumer (1835- ? ) was born Aug. 21, 1835 in or near Southampton Township, Somerset County.

Daughter Rosanna "Anna" Gaumer (1840- ? ) was born on Jan. 3, 1840 in or near Southampton Township, Somerset County.

 

Battle of Shiloh, otherwise known as Pittsburg Landing, Tennessee, where Levi Gaumer was wounded and captured

 

Surgeon's sketch of Levi's wound, 1882

Son Levi Gaumer (1842-1908) was born on Feb. 1 or 2, 1842 in or near Southampton Township, Somerset County. As a boy he migrated to Iowa with his parents, settling in Poweshiek County. He was a farmer in early manhood and stood 5 feet, 9½ inches tall, with a light complexion, grey eyes and black hair. When the Civil War broke out, he traveled to Davenport to join the 8th Iowa Infantry, Company G, enlisting on Sept. 3, 1861. The company was commanded by Lt. Charles Scott. At the Battle of Shiloh, on April 6, 1862, also known as the Battle of Pittsburg Landing in Tennessee, he was shot in the left leg above the ankle. The ball grazed Levi's tibia bone and cut muscles, causing a serious wound. He was captured and held as a prisoner of war and then released via parole in May back to the Union Army. Now nursing an ulcer on the leg, Levi was admitted to an army hospital on July 7, 1862. When the ulcer failed to heal, he was discharged on Oct. 14, 1862. After the war, he resided on a farm in Brooklyn near Victor. On April 28, 1874, at the age of 32, he was awarded a military pension for his wartime wound [Invalid App. #191.927 - Cert. #133.383]. Circa 1878, Levi dwelled in Marion Township, Poweshiek County, IA and by 1879 had moved to Spencer, Clay County, IA. His leg never fully healed, and visually it looked discolored and infected. He wore an elastic rubber stocking on his right leg to help overcome varicose veins which he claimed were caused by weakness of the left leg. He also claimed discomfort in his bowels and rectum as well as "catarrh" of the head which impaired his hearing. At the age of 42, on Oct. 29, 1884, he was united in holy wedlock with 45-year-old Elizabeth Mussbaum (1839-1906), daughter of Nicholas and Christina (Dunn) Mussbaum. Rev. David E. Smith officiated at the ceremony held in Warren Township, Poweshiek County. The couple did not reproduce. Levi is named in Lurton Dunham Ingersoll's 1867 book Iowa and the Rebellion. He was a member of the Mount Olive Lodge of the International Organization of Good Templars (IOGT), a temperance organization with literary interests, considered one of the leading cultural groups in the town. Wrote Dr. J. Irving Manatt in volume 1 of the 1911 book History of Poweshiek County, Iowa, by Leonard Fletcher Parker:

The best thinker among us and most effective speaker was Levi Gaumer (of an old Pennsylvania Dutch family that I should have mentioned before); and who died but recently on his farm southeast of Brooklyn. He was not what we should now call an educated man, but I wish the average college graduate possessed half his real culture -- half his interest in the things of the mind. The last thing I heard of him was that he was reading my 'Mycenaean Age;' and I should value highly his impressions of it.

Elizabeth passed away on March 21, 1906. Levi survived for another two years. He died on May 13, 1908. His remains were lowered into eternal rest in Harmony Cemetery in Poweshiek County. [Find-a-Grave]

Son Samuel Gaumer Jr. (1843- ? ) was born in about 1843 in or near Southampton Township, Somerset County.

Daughter Matilda Gaumer (1846- ? ) was born on May 1, 1846 in or near Southampton Township, Somerset County.

Daughter Amanda Gaumer (1848- ? ) was born on May 24, 1848 in or near Southampton Township, Somerset County.

Son Richard Henry Gaumer (1851- ? ) was born on June 4, 1851 in or near Southampton Township, Somerset County. As a boy, he traveled with his parents to Iowa and in 1860, at age nine, resided with his father and siblings in Victor, Poweshiek County.

~ Son Daniel Gaumer ~

Son Daniel Gaumer (1814-1864) was born on March 25, 1814 or April 12, 1814 in Southampton Township, Somerset County. He also has been named as "David" in census records.

As an adult, he remained in Southampton, where in about 1833 he married Elizabeth Korns (1815-1864), the daughter of Daniel and Elizabeth (Reiber) Korns of Southampton Township. 

The couple had a dozen children. Among the 11 known names were Delilah Gaumer, George Gaumer, Rebecca Gary, Elizabeth Gaumer, Solomon Gaumer, Julia Ann Gaumer, Hannah Gaumer, Edward Gaumer, Simon Gaumer, Lavina Jordan and Minerva Gaumer.

They were farmers in Southampton Township as shown on the federal census enumerations of 1850 and 1860. Tax lists published in the Somerset Herald circa 1846 show that Daniel served as tax collector in the township as well. He served as administrator of the estates of the late Henry Kennel and Samuel Witt, both in 1847.

Daniel passed away in Southampton on Jan. 10, 1864, at the age of 49. Some sources give his place of death as Bedford County. [Find-a-Grave]

Elizabeth only survived her husband by eight months. She joined him in eternity on Sept. 4, 1864. They rest in the Cook Cemetery in Wellersburg.

Their families are spelled out in the 1991 book The Reiber Genealogy: The Descendants of Jacob Reiber, the Immigrant Ancestor of Sandhofen, Germany, 1727-1810, and Later of Lehigh County and York County, Pennsylvania, authored by John Raymond and Edith Fae (Boyer) Reiber (625 pages). 

The couple is named in Clyde Everett Corn's 1957 book History of the Corn Families of the U.S.A. (206 pages) and also in the 1949 book The Genealogy of Michael Korns Sr. of Somerset County, Pennsylvania, authored by Charles Byron Korns (Berlin Publishing Company, 262 pages). Their families also are spelled out in the 1991 book The Reiber Genealogy: The Descendants of Jacob Reiber, the Immigrant Ancestor of Sandhofen, Germany, 1727-1810, and Later of Lehigh County and York County, Pennsylvania, authored by John Raymond and Edith Fae ( Boyer) Reiber ( 625 pages).

Many of their children also moved to Iowa.

 

      
Graves of sisters Elisabeth (1858) and Delilah Gaumer (1860), Cook Cemetery

 

Daughter Delilah Gaumer (1834-1860) was born in about 1834 in or near Southampton Township, Somerset County. She apparently never married. Tragically, just 13 days after reaching her 26th birthday, Delilah died on March 1, 1860. Her remains were placed into eternal repose in Cook Cemetery. Her grave marker -- laying flat on the ground -- was photographed by the founder of this website in September 2016.

Son George Gaumer (1835-1868) was born on Sept. 8, 1835 in Southampton Township. At the age of 31, he was united in marriage with Sarah Carroll ( ? - ? ). During their brief wedded life, they produced one known son, Norman Gaumer. Sadly, George died just two years after their nuptials in about 1868.

  • Grandson Norman Gaumer (1867- ? ) was born in about 1867. He married Effie S. Pryor ( ? - ? ). The Gaumers had three children.

Daughter Rebecca Gaumer (1837-1904) was born on June 17, 1837 in Southampton Township. She married William Henry Gary ( ? - ? ). At least one of their offspring was Katherine Elizabeth Ingram. Rebecca passed away in 1904.

  • Granddaughter Katherine Elizabeth Ingram (1861- ? ) was born in about 1861. In 1883, at the age of 22, she was wedded to Fred Ingram ( ? - ? ). They produced two children.

Daughter Elisabeth Ann Gaumer (1840-1858) was born in about 1840 in or near Southampton Township, Somerset County. She was not fated to reach full adulthood. Heartache enveloped the family on Dec. 1858, when Elisabeth passed away at the age of 18. Burial was in Cook Cemetery, and a stone was erected at the grave. There is an inscription on the marker which is illegible today.

 

Fairfield, Iowa -- the south side of the town square

 

Son Solomon G. Gaumer (1842-1923) was born on June 4, 1842 in or near Southampton Township, Somerset County. Solomon moved west "in an early day," said an Iowa newspaper, and became a pioneer settler of Iowa, settling in Fairfield, Jefferson County. At the age of 29, on Oct. 5, 1871, he was united in marriage with teacher Annie Mary Stewart ( ? -1920), daughter of John B. and Frances (Barton) Stewart. The couple produced nine children, among them Dr. James "Stewart" Gaumer, Jessie May Gaumer, John Edward Gaumer, Dr. Rolla R. Gaumer, Frances B. "Fannie" Breniman, Bessie Gaumer, Charles C. Gaumer, Hugh D. Gaumer and Dr. Archie W. Gaumer. As newlyweds, they made their home in the town of Victor, IA. Beginning in 1873, said the Fairfield Daily Ledger, they "lived continuously in Center township, until 1910, when the family moved to Fairfield." Their farm was in Section 4.  In January 1907, when a Fairfield Township tax controversy, he and T.C. Ross and Louis Barrow submitted a petition to establish territory outside of the town of Fairfield as a separate township. There was no opposition, and the matter was approved, thus creating Center Township. He is named in volume 1 of the 1914 book History of Jefferson County, Iowa: A Record of Settlement, Organization, Progress and Achievement, authored by Charles J. Fulton. Sadly, Solomon suffered a stroke on Dec. 1, 1916 which left him an invalid for the remaining seven years of his life. For a year and a half, the helpless Solomon was cared for at home, but in June 1918 he entered Jefferson County Hospital. Annie died on Sept. 7, 1920, ending a marriage which had spanned 49 years. Solomon died in Jefferson County Hospital on Oct. 4, 1923. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery. [Find-a-Grave] An obituary printed in the Daily Ledger noted that he had:

...been cared for there longer than any other patient who has ever been in the hospital. During all of this time he has retained his mental faculties, always knew his old friends and was interested in all that was going on about him. He has been a great sufferer and death has come in a welcome release after long months of anguish and pain. Mr. Gaumer was a man of quiet character who never aspired to public notice, was a kind father and a good neighbor.

They are described and pictured in a 1977 book authored by their granddaugter, Mildred B. Belknap, This I Remember, Including Breniman and Gaumer Genealogy Notes (124 pages). The book notes that Solomon's birth paper was preserved in Mildred's cedar chest, a gift from her Aunt Bessie Gaumer.

  • Grandson Dr. James "Stewart" Gaumer (1872-1946) was born in 1872. He was a, 1897 graduate of Parsons College in Fairfield and a 1900 graduate of Rush Medical College. Armed with his medical degree, he became a physician, with a practice in Fairfield, IA circa 1912-1923. He married Minnie Marie Corey ( ? - ? ), a 1896 graduate of Parsons College with a bachelor of science. They produced one son, Strewart Corey Gaumer. During the Spanish American War, he enlisted in the 50th Infantry, Company M, and served from April 26, 1898 to Nov. 30, 1898. In 1909, he served as coroner of Jefferson County. Husband and wife were active circa 1912-1913 in the college's Alumni Association, with Minnie on the executive committee and James on the editorial staff of The Alumni Quarterly. During World War I, he served as a medical officer and lieutenant with the ambulance company of the Iowa National Guard. Stewart's aged father resided with them for a time up to his death in 1923. Stewart affectionately was known as "Uncle Doc" to his nieces and nephews. They are named in a book authored by their niece, Mildred B. Belknap, This I Remember, Including Breniman and Gaumer Genealogy Notes (124 pages). He was named to the Fellowship of the American College of Physicians in 1920 at a meeting of the American Congress of Internal Medicine, and held this honor for 26 years until death. He passed away at Fairfield on Sept. 10, 1946. Son Stewart (1918-2005) died on June 13, 2005 after a very active career in Fairfield.
  • Granddaughter Jessie May Gaumer (1874-1875) was born in 1874 in Fairfield. She died on Sept. 6, 1875 with an obituary appearing three days later in the Fairfield Ledger. Burial was in Old Fairfield Cemetery. [Find-a-Grave]
  • Grandson John "Edward" Gaumer (1876- ? ) was born in about 1876. He is believed to have been a pharmacist and to have been licensed by the Iowa Board of Pharmacy (#6681). He was twice married. His first bride was Nellie Teachnor ( ? -1923). Sadly, Nellie died in 1923. After a year as a widower, John was wedded to Lea Krum ( ? - ? ). They resided in Denver in 1923 and later San Francisco, CA.
  • Grandson Dr. Rolla R. Gaumer dwelled in Galesburg, IL, where he had a dental practice.
  • Granddaughter Frances B. "Fannie" Gaumer ( ? - ? ) married Ernest Eugene Breniman (1870- ? ). Their home circa 1923 was in Brooklyn, IA. Ernest attended a Des Moines business college for a year. They met at a wedding of Ernest's cousin Ella Brenimen (daughter of Matilda Gaumer) and George Freese. The couple had several children, among them Mildred Belknap. Mildred attended Parsons College in Fairfield and there met her husband, Lester Belknap.
  • Granddaughter Bessie Pearle Gaumer (1885-1960) was born in about 1885. She was unmarried and lived in Fairfield, IA in 1923. She was loving and generous to her nieces and nephews, and once gave a niece funds to travel to Detroit to attend a student volunteer convention. She was a member of the Daughters of the American Colonists, carrying member #11565. Said the Fairfield Daily Ledger, she was "was employed for a number of years at the Iowa Malleable Iron company. She was later employed in the county auditor's office until her retirement nine years ago. She was a member of the Methodist church, Chapter C, PEO, Order of Eastern Star and the Women's club." She died in 1960 and was interred with her parents and brother Hugh.
  • Grandson Charles C. Gaumer resided in the early 1920s East Moline, IL.
  • Grandson Hugh Donald Gaumer (1889-1947) was born in about 1889. He married Esther Crowel ( ? - ? ). He relocated to California and in 1923 was in San Francisco. He passed away in 1947 and his body placed into repose in Evergreen Cemetery in Fairfield.
  • Grandson Dr. Archie Winnett Gaumer (1878-1920) was born in 1878 in Fairfield. After completing his common school education, he attended a college of dentistry at Keokuk, IA and became a dentist. He established a long-time practice in Bloomfield, IA. During World War I, he was commissioned as a first lieutenant and served in the Army. In 1919, he opened an office in Des Moines. He married Edith Anschutz (1877-1945) but did not reproduce. In 1920, in failing health, he and his wife made their home with her parents in Fairfield. In July of that year, he traveled to Quincy, IL to visit for a week, but his health failed, and he passed away on July 21, 1920, at the age of 42. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery in Fairfield, with an obituary printed in the Burlington Hawk-Eye newspaper. Edith survived her husband by a quarter of a century and apparently remained in Fairfield. She died there on Aug. 16, 1945. Burial was with her husband in Evergreen Cemetery.

Daughter Julia Ann Gaumer (1843-1917) was born on Nov. 29, 1843 in Southampton Township, Somerset County or in Bedford County, PA. She apparently did not marry. At some point she migrated to Iowa, where she made her home in Gilman, Marshall County. She died in Gilman at the age of 73 on June 14, 1917. Burial was in Prairie View Cemetery. [Find-a-Grave]

 

Hannah Gaumer grave, 1863

Daughter Hannah Gaumer (1846- 1863was born in about 1846 in or near Southampton Township, Somerset County. As with her elder sisters Elisabeth and Delilah, Hannah was doomed to an early death. The Grim Reaper swept her away at the age of 17 years, eight months and 17 days on Sept. 25, 1863. Burial was in Cook Cemetery. A stone marker was placed at her grave, and an epitaph was inscribed at the base -- legible when photographed in September 2016 -- reading "Weep not, she is not dead but sleepeth."

Son Edward Gaumer (1848- ? ) was born in about 1848 in or near Southampton Township, Somerset County.

Son Simon Gaumer (1848-1932) was born in 1848 in Southampton Township. At some point in time he migrated to Iowa, settling in Victor, Hartford Township, Iowa County. He married Amanda Manat ( ? - ? ). They produced three known daughters, Belle Gaumer, Maude Gaumer and Lura Gaumer. In 1880, census records show that they dwelled in Victor. Later, their home was in Des Moines, IA. Simon passed away in 1932 at the age of 84.

  • Granddaughter Lura Gaumer (1877- ? ) was born in 1877 in or near Victor, Iowa County.

Daughter Lavina Gaumer (1852- ? ) was born on Aug. 20, 1852 in or near Southampton Township, Somerset County. She married Samuel Jordan (1850- ? ).

Daughter Minerva Gaumer (1855- ? ) was born in about 1855 in or near Southampton Township, Somerset County.

Copyright 2000, 2015-2016 Mark A. Miner