Home

What's New

Photo of the Month

Minerd.com Blog

Biographies

National Reunion

Interconnectedness

Cousin Voices

Honor Roll

In Lasting Memory

In the News

Our Mission and Values

Annual Review

Favorite Links

Contact Us

 

John J. Conklin (1763-1824) and
Elizabeth Phoebe Mills (1766-1852)

 

Elizabeth's grave, Prosperity, PA

John J. Conklin was born on Sept. 30, 1763 in Morris County, NJ, the son of Stephen and Deborah (Dimon) Conkling. He was baptized in infancy on Nov. 6, 1763. He used both the Conkling and Conklin spellings throughout his life.

Elizabeth Phoebe Mills, his wife, was born on March 29, 1766 in Morristown, Morris County, NJ, the daughter of Jedidiah and Sarah “Polly” (Roberts) Mills.

On Dec. 3, 1784, the couple was joined in the holy bonds of wedlock, when he was about age 21 and she 18.

They were the parents of a dozen children. The known names of the eight daughters are Deborah Sargent, Sarah Sargent, Abigail Craft, Climena Johnston, Phoebe Mount, Penina Woodburn, Elizabeth Bell and Mary Andrew. The four sons were John Conklin (eldest), Isaac Conklin, Stephen Conklin and William Conklin. Three daughters were born in the early years of the family's life in New Jersey.

Then, in November 1790, they pulled up stakes and made a monumental overland migration to establish a new home in the wooly wilds of southwestern Pennsylvania. Their final destination was Washington County, PA.

A short biography of John and Elizabeth, in the 1893 book Commemorative Biographical Record of Washington County, relates some of the extreme difficulties in the voyage, especially as it implies that Elizabeth was expecting another baby at the time. The profile read, in part:

The history of the development of any new country affords interesting illustrations of zeal and rigid determination, so essential to the successful prosecution of a difficult undertaking. Of this Captain John Conklin, one of the old pioneers of Washington county, presents a striking example, and his numerous descendants of the present day possess the same characteristics in no small degree.... It is hard to realize the difficulties of that journey by wagon. The route was a very hilly one, the grading steep, rendering it necessary to make frequent stops in ascending a hill, in order that the team might rest. These rests necessitated the services of "a blocker" to follow the wagon, and place a block behind a wheel when a stop was made. This duty devolved upon Mrs. Conklin. In many instances, to render this assistance she left the youngest child at the foot of the hill, and the wagon having reached the summit, she would return and carry the child. Arriving at the glades in the mountains, they were compelled to stop three or four months on account of Mrs. Conklin's illness. Then, renewing their journey, with their four children, on horseback, and leaving all behind except what clothing they could carry on two horses, they arrived in Washington county in May or June, 1791.

 

Above: John and Elizabeth's profile in the 1893 book Commemorative Biographical Record of Washington County, Pennsylvania, Vol. 1. Below: their entry in the 1913 volume The Conklings in America. Both images courtesy Google Books

 

Upon the family's arrival in Washington County, John acquired a 440-acre tract of land near Sparta, along the South Fork of Tenmile Creek. The family remained there for good, and later it passed into the ownership of their son William. Said the Commemorative Biographical Record, "Here [John] devoted his energy to the improvement of the place, which was made to yield a good income."

Despite the fact that he lived for another 34 years after the move to Sparta, John retained ownership in a tract of land in New Jersey. John and Elizabeth also may have speculated in land in Ohio. In 1820, at the marriage of their son John, the son received their gift of a tract on the west bank of Little Darby Creek, opposite the town of West Jefferson, Madison County, OH.

John's health was failing in late February 1824 when he wrote his last will and testament, stating that he was "in a week state of body, but of sound disposing mind memory and understanding, and knowing that it is appointed unto all men once to die, and the better to be prepared to leave this world." The will was witnessed by Luther Day and Francis Baldwin.

 

Man and dog rest on a crude footbridge above Tenmile Creek near Sparta

 

 

Marker directly next to Elizabeth's at Prosperity which could be her husband's

Sadly, John passed away on July 12, 1824 in Sparta. His remains were interred in what today is the Upper Tenmile Presbyterian Church Cemetery in Prosperity. If his grave is marked, the stone is either damaged or illegible, and was not found during an August 2021 visit by descendants David Shaw and the founder of this website. However, Elizabeth's grave is directly beside a fractured marker, surrounded by the same unique plantings, hinting that it might well be John's.

Under the terms of John's will, Capt. Philip Minton and Capt. William Lindly were appointed to serve as co-executors. The document spelled out that Elizabeth was to receive one-third of the profits of the family real estate, so long as she remained his widow. The six eldest daughters Deborah, Sarah, Abigail, Climena, Phoebe and Penina were to receive a payment of $2.00 cash each after a waiting period of two years. Daughter Elizabeth was to be paid $30, and daughter Mary $20, again to occur after two years. Eldest son John was bequeathed $200 from real estate John still owned in New Jersey, along with one bed and bedding. Son Isaac was to inherit one-third of the family farm, or "plantation" in the language of the day, "situate on side next to Samuel Axtells, beginning on the ridge toward Pipeses and runing due North, to strike the bend of the creek near the sugar house, then up the creek to a scrubby white oak..." Isaac also was to get a two-year-old colt, saddle, rifle, bed and bedding. Son Stephen was to receive another third portion of the plantation, "beginning on the ridge next to Pipeses and runing due North, to strike the uper end of the big meadow, then up the fence across the road in a straight line till it comes as high as the uper end of the new field." Additionally, Stephen was given a one-year-old colt, a bed and bedding. Son William was bequeathed the final third of the farm along with a bed and bedding.

After about two years as a widow, Elizabeth wed again in 1826 to Caleb Lindley Jr. (Dec. 25, 1756-1837). In doing so, she gave up her right to the income generated by her first husband's real estate.

Caleb was a native of Mendham, Morris County, NJ. During the American Revolution, he served in the army or local New Jersey militia. He had been married previously and brought at least two sons to the second marriage -- John Lindley (1789-1840) and Lewis Lindley (1793-1860). These Lindleys are said to have descended from Francis Lindley, who emigrated to Newark, NJ from Connecticut in 1667.

The second marriage endured for about 11 years until cleaved apart by death. Sadly, Caleb died at the age of 80 years and 4 months on March 24, 1837. The body was lowered into the sacred soil of Prosperity Cemetery. [Find-a-Grave] On the lower face of his grave marker was inscribed an epitaph, reading in part: "...To dwell with God ... home."

When the federal census enumeration was made in 1850, the 84-year-old Elizabeth resided with her married son William and family on the old homestead in Sparta. The census-taker marked her as having been born in New Jersey. Living next door were the families of Cephas Lindley and John M. Lindley.

Said the Commemorative Biographical Record, Elizabeth spent her life "hardly knowing what sickness was, until she died..."  At the age of 87 years, 3 months and 20 days, Elizabeth succumbed to the angel of death in Sparta on Aug. 16, 1852. She was laid to rest in the Upper Tenmile cemetery. A legible marker stands today at the gravesite.

At John Conklin's death, reported the Commemorative Biographical Record, he and Elizabeth had "given to the country a family of twelve children -- eight daughters and four sons -- all of whom married, forming twelve families of 84 children; sixty-six of the grandchildren married, all but about seven having families, some very large ones."

John and his wife, named as "Phebe," are listed in Ira B. Conkling's book The Conklings in America, published in 1913 by Chas. H. Potter & Co., Inc., Washington, DC.

In February 1932, based on information provided by W.A. Ship, Caleb was acknowledged as a patriot of the revolution.

 

~ Daughter Deborah (Conklin) Sargent ~

Daughter Deborah (Conklin) Sargent (1785- ? ) may have been born in 1785 in New Jersey.

She inherited a payment of $2.00 from her father's estate after his death in 1824, to occur after a waiting period of two years.

Evidence in the 1850 federal census enumeration suggests that she wedded James Sargent (1883-1860). If so, they dwelled in Canton, Washington County, where he was employed as a gatekeeper. He may also be the same James Sargent who, in 1821, opened a tavern in Claysville under the name "Black Horse," serving travelers along the newly-opened National Turnpike/National Road. This Deborah died at age 72 on Sept. 13, 1857, and James on June 18, 1860, with burial in Purviance Cemetery in Claysville.

 

~ Daughter Sarah (Conklin) Sargent ~

Daughter Sarah (Conklin) Sargent (1788- ? ) was born in about 1788 in New Jersey.

She entered into marriage with Valentine Sargent (1785- ? ).

The couple were the parents of Nancy Sargent, Thomas M. Sargent and James Jackson Sargent.

Sarah inherited a payment of $2.00 from her father's estate after his death in 1824, to occur after a waiting period of two years.

When the United States Census was taken in 1850, the couple and their unmarried 40-year-old dauighter Nancy lived together in West Bethlehem Township, Washington County. At that time, Valentine earned a living as a laborer.

Daughter Nancy Sargent (1810- ? ) was born in about 1810. She never learned to read or write.

Son Thomas M. Sargent (1826- ? ) was born in about 1826. A bachelor in 1850, he was a farmer and lived with his parents in West Bethlehem Township, Washington County.

Son James Jackson Sargent (1829- ? ) was born in 1829. He was single in 1850, at age 21, and dwelled at home in West Bethlehem Township, Washington County. His occupation was farming.

 

~ Daughter Abigail (Conklin) Craft ~

Daughter Abigail (Conklin) Craft (1789-1847) was born on Dec. 7, 1789, likely in New Jersey. She would have been an infant when her parents relocated their young family to the wilderness of southwestern Pennsylvania and settled in Sparta, Washington County.

In 1809, when she would have been 19 years of age, she was united in wedlock with John Craft (Nov. 9, 1789-1848), a native of Morris Township, Washington County, and the son of Lawrence Craft.

The couple were the parents of nine -- Delilah "Lila" Dickerson, David Craft, Permina Farabee, Urius Craft, Steward Craft, Stephen Craft, John "Conklin" Craft, Catherine Craft and William Craft.

 

Profile of the family in the 1893 book The Crafts Family: A Genealogical and Biographical History. Courtesy Google Books

 

The Crafts first lived on a farm in Morris Township. After several years, they migrated to nearby East Finley Township. John was said to have been a Democrat and an active volunteer and Sunday School class leader at the Mt. Zion Methodist Episcopal Church.

Abigail inherited a payment of $2.00 from her father's estate after his death in 1824, to occur after a waiting period of two years.

Sadly, Abigail passed away at the age of about 57 on Sept. 7, 1847.

John only lived for another six months as a widower. He died at age 58 on Feb. 21, 1848.

The Crafts' life stories are told in the 1893 book Commemorative Biographical Record of Washington County, volume 1 (Chicago: J.H. Beers & Co.) and also the 1893 volume The Crafts Family: A Genealogical and Biographical History of the Descendants of Griffin and Alice Craft, of Roxbury, Mass., 1630-1890, compiled by James M. Crafts and William F. Crafts (Northampton, MA: Gazette Printing Company).

Daughter Delilah "Lila" Craft (1810-1871) was born on Dec. 5, 1810. When she was 15 years of age, on June 30, 1825, she wedded Thomas Dickerson of Washington County. They did not reproduce. At the age of about 60, Delilah passed away on Sept. 10, 1871.

Son David Craft (1812-1890) was born on Nov. 17, 1812 in Morris Township. He received a common school education. At the age of 25, on March 29, 1838, he was united in the bonds of marriage with Mary Mills (1816-1896), daughter of Stephen and Experience (Lory) Mills of New Jersey. Mary's father, said the 1893 book Commemorative Biographical Record of Washington County, "went to Ohio, where he remained some time, and then returned to Washington county, Penn., settling near Taylorstown." David and Mary spent the first five years of their marriage in East Finley Township, Washington County. Then in 1841, they moved to his home farm in Morris Township. Together, they produced these 11 known offspring -- John M. Craft, William Spencer Craft, Thomas Craft, Stewart C. Craft, Phoebe C. Craft, Stephen L. Craft, Jonas L. Craft, Catherine Melissa Craft, Della J. Lindley and Mary A. Patterson. Said the Commemorative Record, "Mr. Craft first built a log house, and afterward erected a frame dwelling, which was burned, and which he rebuilt. He was an active member of the Democratic party, and in church connectin was an adherent of the M.e. Church for fifty years, serving as trustee during much of that time." David died on Feb. 19, 1890, with interment of the remains in Mt. Zion Cemetery.

  • Grandson John M. Craft (1839- ? ) was born on June 14, 1839. On Feb. 15, 1866, he was united in marital union with Margaret Carroll ( ? - ? ), daughter of William Carroll of Greene County. The couple's two children were Lillian May Craft and Carlos Cortez Craft. By 1877, they relocated to Missouri and farmed in Caldwell County on the outskirts of Kansas City. They remained in Carroll as of 1893.

Great-granddaughter Lillian May Craft (1869- ? ) was born on May 14, 1869. She was young when the family moved to Missouri.

Great-grandson Carlos Cortez Craft (1874- ? ) was born in 1874.

  • Grandson William Spencer Craft (1841-1907) was born on April 3, 1841 in Morris Township, Washington County. During the Civil War, in August 1862, he enlisted in the Union Army. He was placed within the 16th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company K and deployed into the Army of the Potomac. "He took part in the principal battles, and at the close of the war came out unwounded with the exception of a slight bruise made by a ball," said his profile in the 1893 book Commemorative Biographical Record of Washington County. He returned home after the war. On Oct. 13, 1869, he wedded Martha Montgomery (1843- ? ), daughter of John Montgomery. They together bore a family of six -- Leroy J. Craft, George W. Craft, Inez F. Dunkle, Herschel B. Craft, John M. Craft and Jane Adaline Craft. William made a living for four years as the operator of a portable sawmill. Then perceiving that farming would be more lucrative, they settled on a farm near Prosperity, remaining for two years. The family pulled up stakes again and moved to East Finley Township, and after a year moved once more to West Finley Township. The Crafts remained in West Finley for 11 years before acquiring a home in South Strabane Township, where they dwelled in 1893. Said the Commemorative Record, "Mr. Craft has been engaged in the dairy business the past four years, and has a herd of twenty cows, which supply a large city custom. Politically he votes the Democratic ticket, and is interested in all public enterprises. When a youth he united with the M.E. Church at Mt. Zion, Morris township, but since removign to his present home he has attended the Presbyterian Church at Washington." Stricken with heart valve disease, leading to problems in the stomach and liver, he died at the age of 66 on July 16, 1907. Daughter Inez Dunkle, of Bentleyville, PA, was the informant for the Pennsylvania certificate of death. Burial was in the sacred soil of Washington Cemetery.

Great-grandson Leroy J. Craft (1872- ? ) was born in 1872.

Great-grandson  George W. Craft (1874- ? ) was born in 1874.

Great-granddaughter Inez F. Craft (1875- ? ) was born in 1875. She entered into marriage with (?) Dunkle ( ? - ? ). She lived in Bentleyville, PA in 1907.

Great-grandson Herschel B. Craft

Great-grandson John M. Craft

Great-granddaughter Jane Adaline Craft was admitted to the Daughters of the American Revolution, based on the service of Lawrence Craft, member #160333.

  • Grandson Steward/Stewart C. Craft, MD (1844- ? ) was born on Sept. 28, 1844. He became a physician. He relocated by 1877 to Missouri and lived in Polo, MO, where his cousin Oliver Farabee also dwelled at the time. Eventually he moved again to Idaho.
  • Grandson Jonas L. Craft (1850- ? ) was born on May 12, 1850. Just nine days before his 27th birthday, on May 3, 1877, he was united in matrimony with Greene Countian Sadie Loughman ( ? - ? ), daughter of Henry Loughman. The newlyweds first made a home in Morris Township, Washington County.
  • Granddaughter Della Jennie Craft (1855- ? ) was born on Dec. 8, 1855. She wedded Oscar Lindley ( ? - ? ). The couple moved to Kansas and were there in 1893.
  • Granddaughter Mary Anna Craft (1857- ? ) was born on Aug. 17, 1857. She married J.M. Patterson ( ? - ? ). Their residence in the early 1890s was in Washington, PA.

 

Old Concord village, home of the Farabee/Craft branch of the Conklins

 

 

Book naming Permina and Samuel Farabee

Daughter Permina Craft (1814-1871) was born on July 5, 1814 in Washington County. She wedded Samuel B. Farabee (March 18, 1812-1872), son of George and Rebecca (Kelly) Farabee who had moved to Washington County from Kent County, DE. Their five children were Anna Elizabeth Day, Caroline Farabee, Oliver Farabee, Catherine Farabee and Mary Jane Lewis. The Farabees were longtime farmers and made their residence in Morris Township, Washington County. They are known to have lived among a cluster of Farabee farms in Morris Township in 1850 and 1860. Interestingly, the 1850 federal census-taker spelled their surname as "Featherby." Grief blanketed the family at the deaths of their daughters Caroline (age eight days, Aug. 1, 1839) and Catherine (age one, Sept. 10, 1846). Permina succumbed to the spectre of death on Dec. 16, 1871 at about age 57. Samuel lived for another six months. Death cut him away on May 3, 1872. Samuel and the family are named on pages 255 and 286 of Louis Thomas Farabee's 1918 book entitled Genealogy of the Farabees in America.

  • Granddaughter Anna "Elizabeth" Farabee (1837-1907) was born on Sept. 10, 1837 in Washington County. She entered into marriage with Tarsus Day (Jan. 3, 1832-1910). The Days dwelled in Old Concord, Washington County. Nine children in this family were Austin Clark Day, Elroy Clinton Day, Oliver Blachley Day, William Lindsey Day, Elmus Marshall Day, Mary Etta Day, Henry "Porter" Day, Flora Isador Day and Clara Minerva Day. The family mourned at the deaths of infant children Elroy (Sept. 23, 1863) and Mary Etta (March 11, 1872) and teenager Oliver (May 25, 1881). Anna died in Old Concord, PA on Jan. 15, 1907. An examining physician determined that death was caused by "Congestion of Liver and Brain" in addition to a neurisis of two years. Burial was in Mt. Zion Cemetery, and the death certificate was signed by son H. Porter Day of Dunns Station.

Great-grandson Austin Clark Day (1859- ? ) was born on Dec. 7, 1859 in Old Concord, PA. He wedded Emma Schreiner ( ? - ? ) and relocated to Mound City, MO. The couple's two children were Okley Day and Clara Aldeen Day, both born in Western Pennsylvania.

Great-grandson Oliver Blachley Day (1865-1881) was born on Feb. 11, 1865 in Old Concord, PA. He did not live to adulthood. At the age of 16, he died in Old Concord on May 25, 1881. The cause of his untimely passing is not known.

Great-grandson William Lindsey Day (1867- ? ) was born on Feb. 28, 1867 in Old Concord. He maried Leah Bannie Murray (May 8, 1870- ? ). They begat two offspring -- Ralplh Lee Day (born in Waynesburg) and Audley Wayne Day (born in Pitcairn, PA). The Days migrated to Oklahoma and in 1918 lived with William's aunt Mary Jane Lewis at Box 417, Skiatook, OK.

Great-grandson Elmus Marshall Day (1869- ? ) was born on July 13, 1869 in Old Concord. He resided in Dunns Station, PA in 1918.

 

Obituary, 1932

Great-grandson Henry "Porter" Day (1873-1932) was born on March 20, 1873 in Old Concord in the Gale District of Washington County. He was joined in wedlock with Nancy Margaret "Nannie" Martin (Aug. 21, 1877-1974), a native of McMurray, Washington County. A newspaper once said that Porter "spent the early years of his life [in the Gale district] on the farm of his father. He then purchased the Simpson farm on which he resided, specializing in the raising of fruit. For a few years he conducted the Central Hotel at Claysville and for a time also engaged in the restaurant business in Washington as one of the proprietors of the Cafeteria in East Beau street. Failing health caused him to return to the farm." Henry and Nancy dwelled together near the Joint School along Craft Creek near Prosperity, with a post office of Dunns Station. They were the parents of an only son, Raymond Everett Day. Porter contracted influenza in early 1932, and the illness appears to have lingered. Heart disease developed, and he declined into death at the age of 59 on Oct. 15, 1932. A newspaper obituary said he was "widely kinown in Washington County..." Funeral services were held in the Days' home, led by Rev. J.B. Miller of Old Concord Presbyterian Church and aided by Rev. Jacob Ruble of Pigeon Creek. The remains were interred in Prosperity Cemetery. After Porter's death, Nannie waited a baker's dozen years before marrying again. On July 28, 1945, she wedded a second time to high school principal Edward Finley Westlake (Aug. 7, 1879-1964), son of James Fletcher and Mary (Fouche) Westlake. Edward passed away in Washington on Aug. 29, 1964. She died in Washington in late December 1974.

Their only son Raymond Everett Day (1903-1988) was wedded twice, first to Irene Black (June 6, 1897-1948), daughter of J. Miller and Lizzie (Dillie) Black of Prosperity. They too produced an only son, Reed Black Day. They dwelled at 18 Thayer Street in Washington. Raymond earned a living for years as a salesman for General Woodcrafting Company of Canonsburg. Sadly, in March 1948, Irene underwent abdominal surgery for ovarian tumors in Washington Hospital. During the operation, she was stricken by a cerebral embolism and died on St. Patrick's Day 1948, age 50. Her remains were laid to rest in Prosperity Cemetery. Raymond outlived his first wife by four decades. In 1959, his home was at 179 Main Street, Washington. He then was joined in marriage on Feb. 21, 1960 with Mildred Mardell Ullom (Oct. 10, 1904-1995), the great-aunt of the founder of this website, and the daughter of Lantz Hupp and Maud A. (Hinerman) Ullom. Raymond held memberships in the Washington lodge of the Masons, the Scottish Rite of Pittsburgh, Syria Temple, Syria Temple Automobile Club and El Tor Grotto of Wheeling, WV. The couple loved to attend dances. They lived for many years in the old Ullom residence on North Franklin Street in Washington, with their final years in an apartment on Beau Street. Raymond died in Washington Hospital on Feb. 9, 1988. Mildred joined him in death on March 14, 1995. Raymond and Mildred sleep for eternity in the Ullom family lot in Washingtn Cemetery.

Raymond and Irene's son Reed Black Day (July 6, 1924-1959) was born in Washington. He married Esther Faye Magill (May 15, 1930-1959), daughter of James A. and Faye Magill. The pair were the parents of an only son, James Raymond "Jimmy" Day. The family dwelled in Taylorstown, Washington County, where Reed earned a living as a utility worker. Reed took great pride in owning a small foreign automobile. On the fateful day of June 14, 1959, while the family was driving on Route 2 about five miles south of St. Marys, Pleasants County, WV, their small car struck an oncoming vehicle head-on. Reed and Esther were killed instantly, and their son died in an ambulance en route to a hospital. The United Press International prepared a story that was distributed widely to newspapers throughout Pennsylvania. It reported that a driver from Charleston, WV had "swerved to avoid hitting another vehicle and slammed into Day's auto." Their remains were transported back to Washington for interment in Washington Cemetery.

 

Raymond and Mildred (Ullom) Day, Washington, PA - Courtesy Odger Wayne Miner. Below: the ill-fated family of Reed and Esther (Magill) Day and son Jimmy.

 

Great-granddaughter Flora Isador Day (1875- ? ) was born on Dec. 2, 1875. She was united in matrimony with Ulysses S. Schriver (Nov. 11, 1865- ? ), a native of Wetzel County, WV and likely named for famed Union Army General Ulysses Simpson Grant. Together they bore three children -- Martin Lee Schriver, William Allen Schriver and Susan Elizabeth Schriver. Their home in 1918 was in Dunns Station.

Great-granddaughter Clara Minerva Day (1878- ? ) was born on Oct. 27, 1878. She entered into marriage with Daniel C. Caldwell (March 19, 1876- ? ), a Greene County native. Five children known to have been borne by the couple were Porter E. Caldwell, Anna E. Caldwell, Clara Mayota Caldwell, Daniel Charles Caldwell and Jonathan Caldwell. The children were born in various locations, among them Old Concord, Waynesburg and Wilmerding, PA. Circa 1918, the Caldwells were in Dunns Station.

  • Grandson Oliver Farabee (1842-1886) was born on Oct. 16, 1842 in Washington County. By 1874, he had relocated to Missouri. Oliver wedded Clara Clice Clarkson (July 4, 1853- ? ), who had been born in Knightstown, IL. Their two known daughters were Nellie Metzger and Flora Farabee. Sadly, Oliver surrendered to the angel of death on June 2, 1886 in Polo, MO, at the age of only 43. The widowed Clara moved into her daughter's residence in Chicago and in 1918 was at 6947 Sheridan Road.

Great-granddaughter Nellie Farabee (1874- ? ) was born on Sept. 9, 1874 in Polo, MO. She married Victor Metzger ( ? - ? ). The family was in Chicago in 1918.

Great-granddaughter Flora Farabee (1876-1897) was born on June 15, 1876 in Polo, MO. She passed away at the age of 21, in Cheyenne Wells, CO, on Aug. 8, 1897.

  • Granddaughter Mary Jane Farabee (1851- ? ) was born on Sept. 21, 1851 in Washington County. She was united in wedlock with Greene Countian William S. Lewis (May 16, 1846-1903). Sadly, William succumbed to death in Fitzgerald, GA on Sept. 18, 1903. The widowed Mary Jane migrated to Oklahoma. In 1918, when named in the Genealogy of the Farabees in America, her postal address was with her nephew William at Box 417, Skiatook, OK.

Son Urius Craft (1816- ? ) was born on April 27, 1816.

Son Steward/Stewart Craft (1818- ? ) was born on Nov. 8, 1818.

Son Stephen Craft (1820- ? ) was born on March 19, 1820.

Son John "Conklin" Craft (1822-1844) was born on June 10, 1822 and appears to have been named for his maternal grandfather. At the age of 21, a bachelor, he died on March 16, 1844. His younger sister Catherine followed him to the grave just five days later.

Daughter Catherine Craft (1825-1844) was born on Oct. 17, 1825. She died on March 21, 1844, just five days after her brother John Conklin.

Son William Craft (1828- ? ) was born on April 17, 1828.

 

~ Daughter Phoebe (Conklin) Mount ~

Daughter Phoebe (Conklin) Mount ( ? - ? ) was born in (?).

Married at the time, she inherited a payment of $2.00 from her father's estate after his death in 1824, to occur after a waiting period of two years.

Research is underway to determine if she married Samuel Mount, a merchant of Washington, PA, and bore sons Henry and James.

 

~ Daughter Penina (Conklin) Woodburn ~

Daughter Penina (Conklin) Woodburn ( ? - ? ) was born in (?).

Married at the time, she inherited a payment of $2.00 from her father's estate after his death in 1824, to occur after a waiting period of two years.

 

~ Daughter Elizabeth (Conklin) Bell ~

Daughter Elizabeth (Conklin) Bell ( ? - ? ) was born in (?).

At the death of her father in 1824, she was bequeathed a cash payment of $30 after a waiting period of two years.

 

~ Daughter Mary (Conklin) Andrew ~

Daughter Mary (Conklin) Andrew ( ? - ? ).

In 1824, at the death of her father, she was married and named in his last will to receive a $20 payment, after a waiting period of two years.

 

~ Son John Conklin Jr. ~

Son John Conklin ( ? -1873) was born in (?). He "grew up, always having close friends," said the 1893 book Commemorative Biographical Record of Washington County.

In 1820, he was joined in wedlock with Jane Andrew ( ? - ? ), said to have been "a quiet, kind and loving wife and mother."

Two years into the marriage, the couple relocated to a tract on the west bank of Little Darby Creek, opposite the town of West Jefferson, Madison County, OH. The land appears to have been a gift of his mother.

 

John Jr.'s profile in the 1893 book Commemorative Biographical Record of Washington County, Pennsylvania, Vol. 1. Courtesy Google Books

 

Together, the couple produced a family of seven children, of whom four married.

At the death of John's father in 1824, John was bequeathed $200 from the family's real estate still owned in New Jersey, along with one bed and bedding.

Said the Commemorative Biographical Record, "John was a great hunter, and was soon known for hundreds of miles around by that class of people through the wilderness of central Ohio. All strangers or friends were so cordially welcomed by him that they soon were his loving friends. As soon as his visitors rested, John would order his best team and rig, suitable for the occasion, and rations for each, and off they would go, until all parties were satisfied.".

John died at home along Little Darby Creek on Oct. 26, 1873.

 

~ Son Isaac N. Conklin ~

Son Isaac N. Conklin (1805-1881) was born in about 1805 in New Jersey.

In 1825, he was united in the bonds of holy matrimony with Lydia S. Sayre (1807-1896), also spelled "Sayers" and "Sears."

The Conklins were longtime farmers, residing in Morris Township, Washington County.

The large brood of 11 offspring known to have been born into this family were Sarah Conklin, Elizabeth Thompson, John Mills Conklin, William Harvey Conklin, Henry Mount Conklin, Oliver S. Conklin, Margaret Dyer, Samuel Alden Conklin, Stephen Monroe Conklin, Warren M. Conklin and Lydia Viola Lucas.

Isaac was age 19 when his father died in 1824. Under the terms of the father's will, he was to inherit one-third of the family farm, or "plantation" in the language of the day, "situate on side next to Samuel Axtells, beginning on the ridge toward Pipeses and runing due North, to strike the bend of the creek near the sugar house, then up the creek to a scrubby white oak..." Isaac also was to get a two-year-old colt, saddle, rifle, bed and bedding.

 

Map of the adjacent farms of Isaac and brother William near Sparta, 1874

When the federal census enumeration was made in 1880, Isaac and Lydia lived next door to his brother William in Sparta. That year's census-taker noted that he suffered from "catarrh," an inflammation in the nasal membrane causing an excessive discharge of mucus.

Isaac is believed to have died in Morris Township at the age of 75 on April 6, 1881. Burial was in Prosperity Cemetery. [Find-a-Grave]

Lydia outlived her spouse by 15 years. She succumbed to death two days after Christmas 1896, at the age of 88.

Daughter Sarah Ann Conklin (1827- ? ) was born in about 1827. She married William Rogers ( ? - ? ). They bore children, but the names are not yet known. Sarah and William were deceased by 1904.

Daughter Elizabeth Conklin (1830- ? ) was born in about 1830. She was joined in wedlock with (?) Thompson ( ? - ? ). The couple's one known son was Newton Thompson.

  • Grandson Newton Thompson ( ? - ? )

Son John Mills Conklin (1831-1915) was born on Oct. 17, 1831 or 1830 in Washington County. He was united in holy matrimony with Delilah Henkins ( ? - ? ), daughter of Abraham and Elizabeth (Craft) Henkins of Washington County. The couple went on to together bear an extraordinary 14 children -- among them Hollis P. Conklin, Ida M. Sargent, Lizzie L. Conklin, Shriver C. Conklin, Elver D. Conklin, Charles T. Conklin, Annie E. Conklin, Willie O. Conklin and Oliver G. Conklin plus five who died young. Circa 1850, when he was age 18, John was employed locally in Sparta as a school teacher. He also learned the trade of painting and worked as a contractor for several years in nearby Claysville. Said his profile in the History of Greene County, he "was one of the few who made a financial success of the business. Through his energy, good management and careful investments, he was able, in 1859, to buy a good farm near Beulah Church in Greene County." In about 1869, after a decade on this farm, he sold the tract and then used the proceeds in 1872 to acquire a farm of 201 acres, where he spent many years residing. Added the History of Greene, "He is a first-class farmer, is the owner of a saw-mill, and is also largely interested in the roller flour-mill at Waynesburg, Penn." At the age of 84, after a five-day battle with pneumonia, he surrendered to the spectre of death on Jan. 31, 1915. C.S. Conklin, of Deer Lick, PA was the informant for the Pennsylvania certificate of death. Burial was in Hopewell Cemetery in Washington, PA.

  • Grandson Hollis P. Conklin ( ? - ? ) was born in (?), the eldest of the Conklin sons. Said the History of Greene County, he "was one of the promising young men of his neighborhood ... [and] a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Tragedy struck one day when he was killed "by falling on a circular saw which cut him almost to pieces."
  • Granddaughter Ida M. Conklin married James R. Sargent .
  • Granddaughter Lizzie L. Conklin
  • Grandson Shriver C. Conklin
  • Grandson Elver D. Conklin
  • Grandson Charles T. Conklin
  • Granddaughter Annie E. Conklin
  • Grandson Willie O. Conklin
  • Grandson Oliver G. Conklin

 

Farms of W.H. and H.M. Conkling near Prosperity -- brothers William and Henry?

 

Son William Harvey Conklin (1833-1912) was born on March 7, 1833. He grew up assisting with the family farm work in Morris Township and made that his long life's work. He was joined in matrimony with Isabella (1838- ? ). Together, they bore at least two sons -- Henry Conklin, Clarence Conklin, Matthew Conklin, Lydia Conklin, Margaret "Maggie" Conklin and Theodore Conklin. In retirement, he appears to have moved into the town of Prosperity. He was diagnosed with stomach cancer in July 1912 and suffered for a month and five days until death cut him away at age 79 on Aug. 7, 1912. H.A. Conklin of Prosperity signed the death certificate. Interment was in Prosperity Cemetery.

  • Grandson Henry Conklin (1858- ? )
  • Grandson Clarence Conklin (1859- ? )
  • Grandson Matthew Conklin (1862- ? )
  • Granddaughter Lydia Conklin (1864- ? )
  • Granddaughter Margaret "Maggie" Conklin (1866- ? )
  • Grandson Theodore Conklin (1868- ? )

Son Henry Mount Conklin (1835-1922) was born on April 12, 1835 in Morris Township. He appears to have spent his entire life as a farmer in the community. He is believed to have married Gerusha J. (1841- ? ). Evidence hints that they did not reproduce. When the federal census enumeration was made in 1870, the Conklins were childless and employed 12-year-old David Vansydoch as a domestic servant. In their later years, the couple made their home in Prosperity. Sadly, Gerusha died at age 50 years, five months and 12 days on Sept. 26, 1889. Burial was in Prosperity. Inscribed on her grave marker was this touching poem:

One less at home

The charmed circle broken. A dear face

Missed day by day from its usual place

But cleansed, saved and perfected by grace

One more in Heaven.

For the last decade of his life, he suffered from asthma which left him wheezing and coughing. He also was burdened with chronic heart disease. He was spirited away in death at the age of 87 on Sept. 19, 1922. His remains were laid to rest in Prosperity.

Son Oliver S. Conklin (1837-1901) was born on April 9, 1837 in Morris Township, Washington County. He joined the Union Army during the Civil War and was assigned to the 16th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company K. Discharged on a surgeon's certificate on April 9, 1863, he thus missed the Battle of Gettysburg. The year after his discharge, he traveled to Ohio, perhaps with a thought of settling there. On May 24, 1864, in Hardin County, OH, he entered into the bonds of marriage with Anna Andrews ( ? - ? ). They did not reproduce. The pair pushed further into Missouri, and in September 1868 Oliver purchased about 60 acres of land in Warren County, MO. 1880 lived on a farm in Camp Branch, Warren County. He was granted a military pension in June 1880 as compensation for his injuries. [Invalid App. #375.313 - Cert. #242.566] Then in June 1891, when he received an increase in his monthly pension payments, his name appeared on a list of fellow veteran-pensioners in the Kansas City Times. Death swept him away in Jonesburg, Montgomery County, MO on April 6, 1901. Because her husband had left no will, she was only allowed to claim one-half of his estate, with the other half belonging to his brothers and sisters. Oliver's brother William sued the estate in Warren County Circuit Court in the April Term of 1904, asking that their half of the estate be distributed equally among all. Anna survived as a widow for another 17 years. She was awarded her husband's pension for her support. [Widow App. #741.998 - Cert. #603.742] On Nov. 11, 1918, burdened with hardening of the arteries and dementia ("insanity"), she surrendered to death at age 77 in Fenton, Callaway County, MO. Burial was in Jonesburg City Cemetery..

Daughter Margaret Conklin (1840- ? ) was born in about 1840. She married John Dyer ( ? - ? ).

Son Samuel Alden Conklin (1842-1922) was born in about 1842. He passed away in 1922.

Son Stephen Monroe Conklin (1844- ? ) was born in about 1844. He was married and the father of Guy Conklin, Harvey Conklin, Mrs. Jesse Day, Wray Conklin, Cassius M. Conklin, Charlotte A. Conklin and Lemoyne B. Conklin. Stephen was deceased by 1904.

  • Grandson Guy Conklin ( ? - ? )
  • Grandson Harvey Conklin ( ? - ? )
  • Granddaughter (?) Conklin ( ? - ? ) married Jesse Day ( ? - ? ).
  • Grandson Wray Conklin ( ? - ? )
  • Grandson Cassius M. Conklin ( ? - ? )
  • Granddaughter Charlotte A. Conklin ( ? - ? )
  • Grandson Lemoyne B. Conklin ( ? - ? )

Son Warren B. Conklin (1845-1927) was born on Oct. 9, 1844. He followed his parents and brothers as a longtime farmer. He married Susannah Loughman (Aug. 27, 1846-1927), daughter of Daniel and Rachel (Staggers) Loughman of Greene County. At least one son born to the pair was Isaac Lee Conklin. The couple dwelled near West Union, Morris Township, Greene County. In about 1926, he suffered a stroke and never recovered. After a year of debility, he died at age 82 on July 28, 1927. The remains were laid to rest under the sod of Prosperity Cemetery. Susannah only lived for a few months after her husband's death. Having borne stomach cancer for two years, she passed away at age 81 on Sept. 27, 1927. Lon Conklin of West Union was the informant for the certificate of death.

  • Grandson Isaac Lee Conklin (1877-1965) was born on Oct. 22, 1877 in Morris Township, Washington County. He married Sadie. He died at age 88 on Nov. 4, 1965. They rest for all time in Prosperity Cemetery.

Daughter Lydia Viola Conklin (1848- ? ) was born in about 1848. She wedded (?) Lucas ( ? - ? ). She was deceased by 1904.

 

Grave at Prosperity, PA

~ Son William Conklin ~

Son William Conklin (1810-1880) was born on the Fourth of July 1810, in his parents' log cabin in Sparta, Washington County, PA, the youngest of a dozen children.

William remained at home with his parents until his father's death in 1824. Under the terms of the father's will, William received a one-third share of the family farm along with a bed and bedding.

Thus age 14 at the time, fatherless, William "was bound to John Griffith to learn the shoemaker's trade," said his biographical profile in the 1893 book Commemorative Biographical Record of Washington County, Vol. 1, published in Chicago by J.H. Beers & Co. "Having served his term, he worked as a journeyman shoemaker at different places in Ohio, until 1835, when he returned and settled on his farm in Washington county, where he dwelt until his death."

On March 2, 1838, he entered into marriage with Catharine Ross (May 16, 1818-1909), daughter of Jacob and Abigail Ross and granddaughter of John and Elizabeth Ross of Greene County. Catherine's father was a prominent drover -- a driver of cattle or sheep to market.

Catharine's grandfather was the first landowner at Ruff's Creek near Jefferson, PA. He owned slaves and often was in conflict with local Native American tribes. He was one of the first followers of the newly emerging Disciples of Christ denomination in the region and often rode to Bethany, WV mounted on his large sorrel horse Mose to hear preaching by the Disciples' founder Rev. Alexander Campbell. Catharine's mother is said to have had "remarkable eyesight and strength [and] was out overseeing her farms in Richhill township ... up to a few days before her death."

Together, William and Catharine produced a large family, among them Phoebe Jane Meek, William "Allison" Conklin, Benjamin "Franklin" Conklin, Thomas H. Benton Conklin, Cinderella Sowers, Gleason Philetus Conklin, Harriet Ophelia Belle Conklin, Catherine Ivagenia McClain and Ross M. Conklin. Sadness blanketed the family when son Thomas died at the age of about a year on June 1, 1845.

The United States Census of 1850 lists the Conklins living on a farm in Morris Township, Washington County, with William's elderly, widowed mother in the household.

 

William's profile in the 1893 book Commemorative Biographical Record of Washington County, Pennsylvania, Vol. 1. Courtesy Google Books

 

When the federal census enumeration again was taken in 1860, the family remained on a farm in Morris Township. At that time, the value of William's real estate was estimated to be $5,000 and personal estate $600. They continued to dwell on a farm adjacent to William's presumed brother, Isaac Conklin and family.

William built a new farm home for the family, made of brick, on the old home farm in 1862, during the Civil War years. At some point, he spent a decade as local justice of the peace, where he "filled the office with credit to himself and satisfaction to the people," recounted the Commemorative Biographical Record.

Remaining in Morris Township through the Civil War era and into 1870, as shown in that year's census, William's real estate value had expanded to $8,500 and his personal estate to $1,200.

 

Farms of William and Isaac near Sparta, PA, 1876.

 

For years, William suffered with an affliction which the 1880 census-taker recorded as "nervous trouble." While he had the resources to obtain the best medical care, no cure could be found.

William spent his final years in a brick home on the old Sparta farm. Said the Commemorative Biographical Record, death occurred "within a few feet of the log cabin where he was born."

Stricken with paralysis, Isaac died at the age of 69 on June 25, 1880. An obituary in the Waynesburg Republican said he "was a brother-in-law of Dr. T.W. Ross, lately deceased, and father-in-law of Mr. Ross McClain, late of Waynesburgh, and Cephas Meeks, of Ruffs Creek." The remains were laid to rest in the Upper Tenmile Cemetery in Prosperity. The epitaph inscribed on the face of his upright shaft grave marker reads:

 

Afflictions sore for

years I bore.

Physicians were in

vain.

At length God pleased

to give me ease.

And freed me from

my pain.

 

Catherine survived her spouse by nearly three decades. In her final years, she suffered from "catarrhal jaundice" -- known today as infectious hepatitis. The angel of death carried her away into eternity on Sept. 6, 1909 at the age of 81 years, three months and 20 days. Her son William Allison Conklin signed the official Pennsylvania certificate of death.

Many years later, in 1990, the William and Catherine Conklin family was spelled out in the book The Ross Family of New Jersey: A Record of the Descendants of George and Constance (Little) Ross and Other New Jersey Ross Families, authored by Bob Ross.

Daughter Phoebe Jane Conklin (1838-1914) was born on Dec. 2, 1838 in Washington County. At the age of 21 in 1860, unmarried, she lived on the home farm with her parents in Morris Township. On April 2, 1868, she was united in matrimony with Cephas Meek (Jan. 24, 1832-1892), a native of Washington Township and the son of John and Elizabeth (Boyd) Meek. Their nuptials were held in Greene County. The couple resided along Ruffs Creek in Greene County and had one son, William R. Meek. Cephas was profiled in the book History of Greene County which said he was "a descendant of one of the pioneer families of Greene County." The couple owned a farm of 145 acres. Active in the community, Cephas spent six years on the township school board and at one time served as a judge and inspector of elections. Phoebe Jane held a membership in the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Sadly, Cephas passed into eternity on Nov. 20, 1892. Phoebe outlived him by 22 years and remained in Morris Township. Suffering from "dropsy" -- congestive heart failure, with a buildup of fluids in the lungs -- she died two days after her 76th birthday on Dec. 4, 1914. Lillian L. Conklin, of Dunns Station, signed the death certificate. Burial was in Prosperity Cemetery.

  • Grandson William R. Meek (1869- ? ) was born on Jan. 11, 1869.

 

Prosperity, PA

Son William "Allison" Conklin (1840-1911) was born on March 28, 1840. He received an education in the local common schools and went on to teach for several terms. From there he attended a commercial college, possibly in Pittsburgh, but eventually chose to return to the home farm and make his life's work in agriculture. Circa 1870, a bachelor at the age of 30, and again in 1880 at age 40, he dwelled on his parents' home farm, which he eventually inherited. Allison was profiled in the 1893 book Commemorative Biographical Record, as follows:

He has always been a hard worker, and is possessed of more than ordinary intellect and culture. A genial disposition, which is only found in those who are temperate, characterizes him. He never uses strong drinks or tobacco; never has been known to swear an oath under the most trying circumstances; has always been kind to the poor, true to his word and firm for his rights. His widowed mother, kind, gentle and affectionate, lives with him on the old place, which has been handed down from father to son for three generations. He has been a member of the [Methodist Episcopal] Church for over twenty years, and has served as superintendent of Sunday school, steward and trustee. He is a Democrat, who seeks not office, but is always found working for the man best fitted for the office. No one rejoiced more heartily than he did over the results of the elections of November 8, 1892.

Allison eventually married. Their post office address circa 1911 was Dunns Station. Stricken with "tic douloreux," popularly known as a "tic," a severe pain in the nerves on one side of the face, as well as gastricis, he passed away at the age of 71 years, 2 months and 11 days, on June 9, 1911. Burial of the remains was in Prosperity.

Son Benjamin "Franklin" Conklin (1841-1873) was born on Sept. 12, 1841 or 1842. In young manhood he taught school for several terms, and then opted to pursue a career as a physician. He "read medicine," said the Commemorative Biographical Record, and then attended Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia. He continued his medical studies at Western Reserve Medical College in Cleveland, and upon graduation from there established a medical practice in Fayette City, Fayette County, PA. He went on to a career as "one of the most prominent and successful physicians in the Monongahela Valley." He was joined in wedlock with Millie J. Kelley ( ? - ? ), a native of Salem, OH. They bore a daughter, (?) Boudinot. In May 1869, although absent, he was elected to the Fayette County Medical Society, organized in a meeting in Brownsville, PA. Grief blanketed the family when Franklin died at the age of about 31 on Jan. 18, 1873.

  • Granddaughter (?) Conklin married (?) Boudinot ( ? - ? ). They put down roots in Cleveland, OH.

Daughter Cinderella "Ella" Conklin (1846- ? ) was born on March 27, 1846 or 1847. She was unmarried in 1880 at age 32 and lived at home. She wedded Noah D. Sowers ( ? - ? ) on Feb. 17, 1881, when she was 34 years of age. The couple migrated to Illinois and in the early 1890s made a home in Vermilion County, IL.

Son Gleason "Philetus" Conklin (1849-1901) was born on March 29, 1849. At age 21, in 1870, he taught school in Morris Township, Washington County. On New Year's Day 1879, he entered into marriage with Victorine Wilson (1859-1932), daughter of James Wilson of Franklin Township, Washington County. They bore a brood of six children -- among them James Franklin Conklin, Willard Wilson Conklin, Katherine Roupe, William Allan Conklin and Todd M. Conklin, plus one who died in infancy. In the early 1890s, the family resided near West Union, Greene County. He surrendered to death at age 52 on June 17, 1901.

  • Grandson James Franklin Conklin (1880-1898)
  • Grandson Willard Wilson Conklin (1883-1890)
  • Granddaughter Katherine Conklin (1886-1972) was born in 1886. She wedded (?) Roupe.
  • Grandson William Allan Conklin (1891-1975)
  • Grandson Todd M. Conklin (1895-1980)

Daughter Harriet Ophelia Belle Conklin (1852- ? ) was born on Feb. 6, 1852. At the age of about 23, in 1875, she married Ross McClain ( ? - ? ). Together, they produced seven children. The McClains lived in Greene County in the early 1890s.

Daughter Catherine Ivagenia "Iva" Conklin (1856- ? ) was born on Independence Day 1856. She was age 22 in 1880, when she was single and residing with her parents. On March 7, 1888, she was united in marital union with George E. Mann ( ? - ? ). One known daughter born to the couple was Chloe Mann. As with Catherine's married sister Cinderella Sowers, the Manns also relocated to Vermilion County, IL.

Son Ross M. Conklin (1861- ? ) was born on Aug. 4, 1861. After completing his common school studies, he enrolled in a college and eventually attended Duff's Commercial College in Pittsburgh from which he graduated. In 1884, he moved to Kansas and taught school for four years in McPherson, KS. On May 28, 1888, he was joined in matrimony with Madeline Burwell ( ? - ? ), a McPherson resident. The newlyweds made the decision to relocated to the Pacific Northwest and soon moved to Oregon. There, Ross was employed as principal of Roseburg College, and Madeline as an instructor at the school.

 

~ Son Stephen Conklin ~

Son Stephen Conklin ( ? - ? )

Stephen's father died in 1824. Under the terms of the last will, Stephen was to inherit a one-third portion of the family farm, or "plantation" as it was known, "beginning on the ridge next to Pipeses and runing due North, to strike the uper end of the big meadow, then up the fence across the road in a straight line till it comes as high as the uper end of the new field." Additionally, he was given a one-year-old colt, a bed and bedding.

It is altogether possible that he is the same "Stephen Conkling" who at one time was a tavern keeper along the National Turnpike/National Road, in Washington County, as named in the 1910 book by Joseph F. McFarland, entitled 20th Century History of the City of Washington and Washington County, Pennsylvania and Representative Citizens.

Nothing further is known.

 

Copyright 2021 Mark A. Miner

David Shaw and Heather Ann (Miner) Dandy have contributed valuable content for this biography.