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Solomon Heinly Gaumer
(1809-1860)

 

Weisenberg Lutheran Church,
New Tripoli, a local landmark

Solomon Heinly Gaumer as born on April 4, 1809 in Macungie Township, Lehigh County, PA, the son of Johann Dietrich "Dieter" and Anna Elizabeth (Heinly) Gaumer.

In about 1828, in Lehigh County, the 19-year-old Solomon was united in matrimony with 26-year-old Hester Maria ("Esther" or "Hettie") Rumbel Klotz (1802-1883) of Lowhill Township, Lehigh County. Her maiden name also has been spelled "Rumple."

Their family of eight known children were Moses Solomon Gaumer, Jonathan Gaumer, Ann "Caroline" Ihrie, Samuel Gaumer, Sarah Ann Wiltrout, Amanda Koch, Solomon Gaumer and Benjamin Lewis Gaumer.

When the federal census enumerations were made in 1850 and 1860, the family dwelled in Upper Macungie Township. The 1850 census record shows Solomon earning a living as a farmer, with five children in the household as wll as 63-year-old Barbara Klotz.

In the 1860 census record, the 51-year-old Solomon labored as a farmer, assisted in the work by his sons Solomon (age 18) and Benjamin (16). Also residing in the household was 22-year-old servant Catharine Heilman. In 1860, they made their home in Weisenberg Township, Lehigh County.

At the age of 51, Solomon died  in Weisenberg on July 12, 1860. The cause of his passing is not yet known. [Find-a-Grave]

Esther lived for another 23 years. She died in Upper Macungie Township on Oct. 7, 1883.

The couple was remembered and named publicly many years later, in 1917, in the respective Allentown newspaper obituaries of their daughter Sarah Wiltrout and son Benjamin Lewis Gaumer.

 

~ Son Moses Solomon Gaumer ~

 

Moses' grave marker

Son Moses Solomon Gaumer (1829-1898) was born on March 27, 1829 in Macungie Township, Lehigh County.

He grew up on the family farm. When reaching the age of maturity, he was confirmed into membership of the Evangelical Lutheran Church, with Rev. Shingle officiating.

At the age of 21, on Christmas Day 1850, he was united in marriage with a cousin, 21-year-old Mary Anna Knedler (April 5, 1829-1878), daughter of Andreas and Salome Däsch (Gaumer) Knedler and granddaughter of Johann Dietrich and Rebecca Margaretha (Strunck) Gaumer Jr.

Their family of five children were Eliza Jane Paslay, Charles Edward Gaumer, Elmanda Rebecca "Ella" Thorp, Jeremiah Franklin Gaumer and Milton Herman Gaumer.

The United States Census enumeration of 1860 shows the Gaumer family in Lower Macungie Township, with Moses working as a master carpenter. Sometime soon after the end of the Civil War, in 1865, the couple made the momentous decision to migrate to Indiana and settle in Onward, Tipton Township, Cass County. There, their youngest child Milton was born in 1867.

Federal census records for 1870 show the family in Tipton Township, with Moses now earning a living as a farmer.

Sadly, Mary Ann died in Onward at the age of 49 on April 28, 1878. The cause of her passing may be lost to the ages.

Moses lived for another two decades. In 1880, when again listed in the U.S. Census, Moses remained in Tipton Township and headed a household including his daughter Almanda, sons Jeremiah and Milton, and grandson Franklin Thorp (age 5) and Oliver J. Shafer (2 months). In July 1881, he purchased a "truction engine" which, said the Evening News, was "run along the streets to-day, pulling a separator."

After a dozen years as a widower, he married for a second time to Hannah Deford ( ? - ? ) on May 11, 1890, at the age of 61.

He succumbed in Onward at the age of 68 years, nine months and 27 days on Jan. 23, 1898. Funeral services were held in the Walton Evangelical Lutheran Church, with Rev. J.A. Burket preaching the funeral sermon, followed by burial in the Zhomar Cemetery. In an obituary, the Daily Pharos called him "a pioneer resident of Walton" and published this poem of sadness:

 

'Tis hard to break the tender chord,
When love has bound the heart,
'Tis hard, so hard to speak the words,
We must forever part.
Dearest loved one we must lay thee by
In the peaceful grave's embrace.
But thy memory will be cherished,
'Til we see thy heavenly face.

 

 

Charles Edward Gaumer, a carpenter
Courtesy Paula (Gaumer) Tooke

Son Charles Edward Gaumer (1848-1934) was born in about 1848 or on Nov. 29, 1853 in Lower Macungie Township, Lehigh County. As a teenager, in 1865, he migrated to Indiana with his parents and siblings. He was only to return to his old Lehigh County home area twice in his life. The first was in 1873, after he had been away for eight years. Then in 1876, Charles married Jessie Freemont Hankins (1859-1932), an Illinois native whose parents were from New Jersey. The couple produced seven children, all daughters but one -- Cora Kilgore, Olive Salisbury, Winifred Gaumer, Jessie Burnett, Ina Moore and Iva L. Gaumer and an unnamed son who died in infancy in 1890. Their home for decades, during the 1880-1920 timeframe, was on a farm in LaPrairie Township, Marshall County, IL. Charles and his siblings are believed to have shared ownership of a tract of land in the Walton community near Logansport, Cass County, IN. Circa 1895, he and others filed a legal claim against their brother in law Robert G. Paslay "to redeem certain land in Tipton township," said the Logansport Reporter. Circa 1900, boarder Samuel Kilgore lived in their home and also worked as a farmer. Charles also earned a living through his skill as a carpenter, and he is shown in this occupation in the United States Census of 1910. Charles returned to Lehigh County again in August 1909, and a reception was held at Dorney Park on Aug. 29, honoring both him and his aged aunt Mary Ann (Hersh) Gaumer of Cementon, PA. A story in the Allentown Morning Call said that "In 1865 Mr. Gaumer left these parts and located in Indiana. In 1873 he returned to Lehigh County to visit all relatives and now he is on the same errand." The Morning Call also reported the names of all who attended the reception:

William Gaumer, Mrs. William Gaumer, Elwood Gaumer, Winslow Gaumer, Mrs. Winslow Gaumer, Florence Gaumer, Ida Meitzler, Effie Walters, Mabel Meitzler, Pauline Meitzler, all of Cementon; Mr. and Mrs. Warren Parker, Lizzie, Clara, Harry, Ira, Herbert, George, and Roland Parker, Mrs. Jane Laudenslager, all of Emaus; Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Ward, of New York; Mr. and Mrs. henry Hersh and grandson, of Allentown, Mrs. Frank Kuhns, Mabel Kuhns, Mr. and Mrs. William Kuhns, Harold and Herman Kuhns, George Huber, Mrs. George Huber, Isabel Kester, Mrs. Benjamin Gaumer, Kate Wertman, Edna Wertman, Roland Wertman, Ada Kuder and Mrs. Caroline Erie, of Allentown; Mrs. Sallie Wiltrout, Edgar Landis, Mrs. Lillie Landis, Raymond and Paul Landis, of Guthsville; Jacob Landis and Mrs. Mabel Landis, of Allentown.

By 1920, the couple had moved into the household of their married daughter and son in law, Ina and Tony Moore, in Elmwood, Peoria County, IL. Toward the end of his life, he dwelled in Speer, IL. Charles died in Speer at the age of 86 on Nov. 11, 1934. An obituary appeared in the Logansport Pharos-Tribune. [Find-a-Grave]

  • Granddaughter Cora Gaumer (1877- ? ) was born in about 1877 in Illinois. In 1891, at the age of 14, Cora reputedly married 23-year-old Grant G. Kilgore (1868- ? ). They were the parents of Hobart Kilgore (born 1895), Gladys Kilgore (1898), Wilfred E. Kilgore (1914) and Madeline Kilgore (1916). In 1910-1920, the family dwelled in Toulon, Stark County, IL, with Grant earning income as a woodworker in a shop in 1910 and as a jailer at the Stark County Jail in 1920.
  • Granddaughter Olive Gaumer (1877-1963) was born on Nov. 6, 1877 in Lawn Ridge, IL. On Jan. 26, 1899, at the age of 21, she was united in the bonds of wedlock with William Edward Salisbury (March 22, 1871-1920), a native of Saratoga Township, Marshall County, IL. They were the parents of four children -- Maybelle Beatrice Naden McNairn, Elmer Raymond "E.R." Salisbury, Anna Mae Hall and Jennie Marie Christensen. The family lived in or near Castleton, Stark County, IL circa 1895 when William joined the Odd Fellows lodge. They are known to have been in Camp Grove, Marshall County IL circa 1901, when their son was born. Later, they relocated to Minnesota and put down roots in Osakis, which spans Douglass and Todd Counties and borders Lake Osakis. At some point they purchased a 76-acre farm a mile west of town. William was considered a prominent business man and farme, managing the Osakis Shipping Association. He was a director of Farmers' State Bank and the local school board. Socially, he transferred his Odd Fellows membership to the Alexandria lodge in 1919 and joined the Osakis lodge of the Masons in 1907. But at age 49 he suffered from heart lesions and heart valve disease, which led to his demise. On the fateful evening of Oct. 10, 1920, he went to a farewell party for Otto Lier in the man's home in Orange, located five souths south of Osakis. William was playing a game of cards when, said the Osakis Review, he "suddenly fell forward with his arms on the table. He was laid on the sofa and vigorous rubbing resorted to bring back respiration, but the spark had gone out forever, and the merrymaking was turned into deepest mourning." The Review then eulogized that "News of Mr. Salisbury's sudden taking away spread rapidly over the community Sunday morning and cast a shadow of gloom over town and country, where he has been active in a business and social way. Saturday he was in Osakis meeting his friends and associates as usual, and if he had been feeling ill he had kept his ailments to himself. His tragic death is a terrible blow to the bereaved family and they have the deep and abiding sympathy of the entire community." Rev. A.W. MacNeill preached the funeral sermon, basing his text on John 11:25-26. His death left Olive a widow at age 43, and she outlived him by 43 years. Toward the end of her life, she became a resident of Bethany Home in Alexandria, MN. Then at her 85th birthday, the family gathered for a party in her honor, 26 members in all, at the home of her son Elmer. Reported the St. Cloud (MN) Times, "Guests entertained were from Zion, Ill., Mankato, Park Rapids, Brandon, Alexandria and Osakis." She died on Sept. 8, 1963. Interment was in Lakeside Cemetery in Todd County.

 

Old greeting from the Salisburys' community of Osakis, Minnesota

 

  • Granddaughter Winifred Gaumer (1880- ? ) was born in Jan. 1880 in Lawn Ridge, Marshall County, IL. Nothing more is known, except that she is believed to have died young, sometime prior to 1900.
  • Granddaughter Jessie Gaumer (1884- ? ) was born in Sept. 1884 in Lawn Ridge, Marshall County, IL. She was joined in wedlock with (?) Burnett ( ? - ? ). She died in 1956 in the same community in which she was born.
  • Granddaughter Ina S. Gaumer (1891-1976) was born on Feb. 11, 1891 in Lawn Ridge, Marshall County, IL. She wedded Tony Fines Moore (Nov. 16, 1890-1955). Their nuptials were held in Galveston, Galveston County, TX. Two children were born to the Moores -- Phyllis A. Moore (born 1919) and Winifred E. Brown. When the federal census enumeration was made in 1920, the Moores lived in Elmwood, Peoria County, IL, on Magnolia Street, and provided a home for Ina's parents. There, Tony earned a living as a telegraph operator. At some point the family relocated to California, by the early 1920s, where daughter Winifred was born in Fresno in 1923. Tony passed into eternity in Fresno, Fresno County, CA on Oct. 15, 1955. Iva survived her husband by 21 years. She spent her later time in San Diego and died there on Aug. 27, 1976.
  • Granddaughter Iva L. Gaumer (1891-1897) was born on Dec. 15, 1894 in Lawn Ridge, Marshall County, IL. At the age of 19 in 1910, unmarried, she lived at home with her parents in LaPrairie Township, Marshall County..

Daughter Eliza Jane Gaumer (1851-1913) was born in Nov. 1851. She married Robert G. Paslay (March 18, 1849-1912) of Cass County. They bore seven offspring -- infant twins who died as babies, Rosetta M. Cannady, Nora Ellen Paslay, Eveline Jane "Eva" Vernon, Eveline Paslay, Harry B. Paslay, Estella V. Paslay and Andrew Pasley. Federal census records for 1880 show the couple living on a farm in Jefferson, Cass County, IN. Sadly, the babies died in 1881, son Harry in 1880 at age one and daughter Estella in 1889 at age five. By 1900, the had relocated to Tipton, Cass County. Others living in their household in 1900 were niece Dessie Anderson (age 9) and servant Floyd Wilson (age 13). The couple owned or controlled land in Tipton Township but were sued by Eliza Jane's brother Charles and others in some sort of legal maneuver or dispute. Robert died at the age of 62 or 63 on Sept. 28, 1912. Interment was in Deer Creek Cemetery in Onward, Cass County. Suffering from organic heart trouble, Eliza joined him in death a year later on April 24, 1913.

  • Granddaughter Rosetta M. Paslay (1874- ? ) was born in about 1874. She married (?) Cannady ( ? - ? ).
  • Granddaughter Nora Ellen Paslay (1874- ? ) was born in Dec. 1874 in Indiana. At the age of 25 in 1900, unmarried, she lived with her parents in Tipton, Cass County. Then on Jan. 21, 1903, she was united in matrimony with George W. Benson ( ? - ? ). News of their marriage was published in the Logansport Pharos-Tribune. The couple did not reproduce. They were farmers and made a home in 1910 in Tipton and in 1920 in Bethlehem, Cass County.
  • Granddaughter Eveline Jane "Eva" Paslay (1877-1959) was born on July 29, 1877 in Cass County, IN. She was joined in holy wedlock with Frank Hollingsworth Vernon (Feb. 28, 1876-1943) of Cass County. The couple were the parents of six children -- Marie DeWitt, Angeline Working, Margaret Tomlinson, Harry Vernon, Emerson Vernon and Roy Vernon. They were members of Crooked Creek Christian Church. Frank passed away on May 28, 1943. Eva Jane lived for anothe 16 years as a widow. At the age of 82, she died in Woodlawn Hospital in Rochester, IN on Sept. 15, 1950. Rev. Virden Graham officiated the funeral services held at the family church, with burial in Crooked Creek Cemetery. An obituary was printed in the Logansport Press, misspelling her mother's maiden name as "Garner." She was survived by 16 grandchildren and a dozen great-grandchildren.

Great-granddaughter Marie Vernon married (?) DeWitt and lived in Burnettsville, IN in 1959.

Great-granddaughter Angeline Vernon wedded (?) Working. Her home in 1959 was in Fort Wayne and in 1977 in Valparaiso, IN.

Great-granddaughter Margaret Vernon was joined in wedlock with (?) Tomlinson. She dwelled in Rochester, IN.

Great-grandson Harry G. Vernon (1901-1977) was born on May 4, 1901 in Cass County. On Dec. 5, 1923, in nuptials held in Logansport, Cass County, he married Idella Elizabeth Mohler (June 21, 1907-2004). The Vernons made a home in Idaville, IN and were the parents of Robert Lee Vernon, Paul Edward Vernon, Marjorie Ann Vernon. He died in Logansport, IN on Aug. 18, 1977. Idella outlived her spouse by nearly three decades. She joined him in death on Sept. 13, 2004 in Tucson, AZ.

Great-grandson Emerson Vernon resided in Lake Cicott, IN and in 1977 in Logansport..

Great-grandson Roy Vernon established a residence in Valparaiso, IN and in 1977 in Michigan City, IN..

  • Grandson Andrew Pasley (1881- ? ) was born on Feb. 3, 1881. In 1908, in a wedding held in Pulaski, IN, he was united in matrimony with Mabel Smith ( ? - ? ). Their four offspring were Dale Pasley, Irene Pasley, Betty Pasley and Mary Stout. In about 1919, after 11 years of marriage, Andrew and Mabel separated, with him moving out of the house. Just having delivered a newborn daughter, she filed a claim for divorce in August 1920, seeking $200 annually. She alleged that Andrew had treated her with cruelty and that his whereabouts were now "unknown." News of the divorce claim was printed in the Logansport Pharos-Tribune and Fort Wayne Sentinel. In 1924, their 14-year-old son Dale suffered a badly crushed foot when his bicycle "upset" and he was run over by a moving log truck. The damaged foot eventually was amputated. When Mabel could not pay for the surgery, a legal claim was filed by Charles A. Ballard, seeking payment plus costs of collecting the debt. Mabel passed into eternity in St. Joseph's Hospital in Logansport on Nov. 12, 1950.

Great-grandson Dale Pasley (1910-1964) was born on Oct. 7, 1910. He married Mary Lee Ledbetter (1920- ? ). A daughter was born to the couple, Alice Mae Pasley. They lived in Hennepin, MN. Dale died there on Sept. 26, 1964.

Great-granddaughter Mary Pasley (1920-1979) was born on Aug. 13, 1920 in Logansport. Born after her parents separated, she was taken in by foster parents, Benjamin and Mary Erb. She was the mother of Helen May Russow and Russell Walters. On Nov. 18, 1944, she wedded David C. Stout ( ? - ? ). The Stouts made a home at 820 South Webster Street in Logansport. For two decades, Mary was employed by Moore's Drug Store in Kokomo. She also belonged to the St. Joan of Arc Catholic Church and was active with its Rosary Altar Society. She died on June 25, 1979. Following a funeral mass in the family church, led by Rev. Leroy Kinnaman, her remains were interred in Sunset Memory Gardens Cemetery. An obituary was printed in the Kokomo Tribune.

Daughter Elmanda Rebecca "Ella" Gaumer (1856-1881) was born on Christmas Day 1856 in Lower Macungie Township, Lehigh County. At about the age of 10, she accompanied her family on a migration west into Indiana, settling in Cass County. There, in nuptials held on Feb. 8, 1875, she married Leroy Thorp (1851- ? ), a native of New York State. Two sons were born to the union -- Franklin E. "Frank" Thorpe and Henry W. Thorp. They made a home in Tipton Township, Cass County. Sadness blanketed the family when infant son Henry died at the age of three-and-a-half months on Feb. 12, 1877. The marriage ended within a year or two, and Elmanda and her young son moved back into her father's home in Tipton, Cass County. During that time, she bore a son, Oliver Gaumer Shafer, in April 1880. Elmanda is shown in the father's household in the 1880 federal census, marked as "divorced" and bearing the name "Gaumer." Research by others has identified the father of the second son as James A. Shafer ( ? - ? ).

  • Grandson Franklin E. "Frank" Thorpe (1875-1958) was born on Feb. 8, 1875 in Tipton Township, Cass County, IN. In later life he claimed he was a native of St. Louis. Frank in young manhood was employed by M.R. Ransom. His work duties took him to, among other places, Castalia, Erie County, OH. It was on one of these trips that he met his future bride. On Oct. 28, 1900, at the age of 25, Frank married German immigrant Lena Krebs (1881- ? ). Their wedding mass was held at St. Mary's Catholic Church, officiated by Rev. Rebholz, and with Fred Strasser standing as best man. The couple bore twin sons -- Oliver T. Thorpe and John Leroy Thorpe. The family dwelled in Venice, Erie County, where Frank became employed in 1904 as a rural postal carrier, the only one in the Venice community. Said the Sandusky Register, "During his thirty years service, he was absent but twice." Frank retired on Dec. 1, 1934. He told a Register reporter that the the final workday "was the saddest day of his life. For 30 years he had served the route, bringing messages of births and deaths, telling the rural residents what the prospects for the next day's weather were, who had removed from the route and who was ill." Another story in the Register said that if all the miles were added together which he had logged, it would be "a distance equal to more than seven times around the world in blizzards, in heat, in rain and in flood... During the big snow of 1918 he delivered the mail for 32 days in a box sled with a horse. Drifts were so deep and the going so hard he often times left the horse near the western end of the route and walked the last 14 miles, taking a circuitous route through the fields to deliver the mail." During his tenure, the number of customers tripled from 300 to about 900. He appears to have focused on farming after that. Lena was a longtime member of the Mother and Altar Society of the St. Mary's church. They celebrated their golden anniversary in October 1950 by attending a special Saturday morning mass at the very same church where they had been wed, and then a Sunday afternoon reception at home. Later in the 1950s, Frank resided in Sandusky, Erie County, OH at the address of 417 Thorpe Drive. He was a member of the Sandusky Maccabees. He was hospitalized at Providence Hospital where he died at the age of 83 on Sept. 17, 1958. A solemn requiem mass was sung at their church, led by Rev. Thomas Ankenbrandt and assisted by deacon Rev. Frank Nieset and subdeacon Rev. V.A. Volin. Interment followed in Calvary Cemetery, with these pallbearers carrying his remains to their final rest -- James Thorpe, Thomas Thorpe, Richard Thorpe, Walter Herzog, Robert Holman and William Hecksters. A death notice was printed in the Register.

Great-grandson Oliver T. Thorpe was united in marriage with Mahinda Thorpe. Their four children were Joan thorpe, James Thorpe, Carol M. Thorpe and Richard Thorpe. Oliver earned a living in 1950 with the Frey Funeral Home in Sandusky.

Great-grandson John Leroy Thorpe was joined in holy wedlock with Ruth Estell Hargis (1902- ? ) of Marion, TN. They bore on son, Thomas Franklin Thorpe. John's second wife was Luila Thorpe (1910- ? ) of Ohio. Circa 1950, John lived in Venice, where he managed the Meadow Lane Dairy and was an inspector with the Union Chain and Manufacturing Company.

  • Grandson Oliver Gaumer Shafer (1880-1965) was born on April 22, 1880 in Tipton Township, Cass County. On Feb. 23, 1910, in a ceremony in Logansport, Cass County, the 30-year-old married Anna Rachel Minnick (1878-1963). Their union endured for more than 53 years. The couple's only known son was Russell Minnick Shafer. The year of their marriage, they established a home in Richmond, Wayne County, IN, where they remained for good. Oliver earned a living as an engineer with the Pennsylvania Railroad. Anna was a member of the Daughters of Civil War Veterans and the First English Lutheran Church. Their address in the 1960s was 63 South 16th Street. Anna passed into eternity on June 7, 1963. Rev. A.R. Swasko preached the funeral sermon, with burial following in the Lutherania Cemetery. Oliver outlived her by two years. He was admitted to Reid Memorial Hospital in Richmond, where he joined Anna in death on April 22, 1965. An obituary appeared in the Richmond Palladium-Item, Anderson Herald and Anderson Daily Bulletin. Rev. Swasko again officiated the funeral.

 

Russell Shafer's workplace, the Delco Remy plant in Anderson, IN

 

Great-grandson Russell Minnick Shafer (1912-1995) was born on April 6, 1912 in Richmond Wayne County, IN. He received a bachelor's degree in 1933 in electrical engineering from Purdue University. Russell wedded Betty M. Myerly ( ? - ? ). Their only son was Willliam "Bill" Shafer. In 1934, during the heart of the iron grip of the Great Depression, he joined Delco-Remy, a manufacturer of motor vehicle starter systems, as a night-shift inspector. He spent the next 38 years with the company, with the family making its home in Anderson, IN. He was promoted to assistant foreman and trouble checker and then over time to inspection foreman, assistant supervisor of inspection in Plant 2 and then supervisor during the World War II years. He was tapped to become manager of product reliability in 1967. Russell retired on the last day of 1973. He was featured and pictured in a related story in the Anderson Daily Bulletin, which said that "for nearly four decades [he] has contributed to the quality standards of General Motors and the automotive industry." Russell was a life member of the Mount Moriah lodge of the Masons, Anderson Noon Kiwanis Club and Anderson Chamber of Commerce and served as a board director of the Anderson Country Club. Russell died on Feb. 4, 1995. His obituary was published by the Indianapolis News, and burial was in Elwood City Cemetery.

Son Jeremiah Franklin Gaumer (1860-1892) was born on March 27 or 29, 1860 in Lower Macungie Township, Lehigh County, PA. He lived at home and labored as a farmer in 1880. As a young man, Jeremiah migrated to Indiana and put down roots in or near Walton, Cass County. When he was about age 21, on Oct. 20, 1881, he was joined in holy matrimony with 21-year-old Sarah A. Snell (Jan. 2, 1860-1931), daughter of Henry Runyan and Phoebe Ann (Blinn) Snell of Onward Township, Tipton County, IN. News of their marriage license was printed in the Logansport Pharos-Tribune. They became the parents of seven children, born between the years 1882 and 1891 -- Charles Edward Gaumer, Clara Jane Johns, Henry Moses Gaumer, Mary A. Gause Hyson, Melissa Gaumer, an infant son, Melissa Gaumer and Jacob R. Gaumer. The baby son died in Cass County on Nov. 27, 1888, baby Melissa in 1890 and baby Jacob sometime during the 1890s. In 1889, living in the town of Dow (later renamed Onward), IN, Jeremiah was issued a U.S. Patent for his invention, a straw stacker, as reported by the Hamilton County Ledger. The stacker was assigned patent #409,398.

 

Sketch for Jeremiah's patented invention, a straw stacking machine

 

Sadly, at the age of 31, Jeremiah died on Jan. 28 or 29, 1892. The cause of his untimely demise is not yet known. Burial was in Deer Creek Cemetery in Onward. A year after his death, a court ruled that his estate was insolvent, as reported in the Pharos-Tribune. Sarah outlived her first husband by almost four decades. She wedded again to Francis M. Zimmerman ( ? - ? ) in the 1890s. They divorced on Sept. 30, 1897. On Feb. 3, 1898, she was united in wedlock with her third spouse, William Bechdol (Dec. 15, 1865-1935) with the wedding taking place in Cass County. The couple made a home in Tipton Township, Cass County, where William worked as an "engineer" in a saw mill. Circa 1910, Sarah was separated but using the married name "Bechdol." That year, she was in Gas City, Grant County, IN, with her divorced daughter Mary A. Gause and five-year-old grandson Edward Gause i nthe household. Sarah passed away in the home of her married daughter Clara, in Walton, Cass County, on May 20, 1931. Willliam Bechdol lived for another four years and succumbed at the age of 69 in Walton, Cass County on June 30, 1935.

  • L-R: Ethel, Ralph, Emma, Lee and Charles E. Gaumer. Courtesy Paula (Gaumer) Tooke

    Grandson Charles Edward Gaumer (1882-1974 ) was born on July 17, 1882 in Onward, Cass County, IN. At the age of 17, in 1900, he resided with his mother and stepfather William Bechdol in Tipton Township, Cass County, and worked as a farm laborer. then in 1903, when he was 21 years of age, he married 19-year-old Emma Georgia Foster (Oct. 29, 1883-1965), a native of Edelstein, Marshall/Peoria Counties and the daughter of William and Ada (Nickerson) Foster. They bore three offspring -- Ethel Lucille Witzig, Charles Leroy Gaumer and Ralph Edward Gaumer. Federal census records for 1910 show the Gaumers in Hallock Township, Peoria County, IL, with Charles earning a living as a carpenter on a "day work" basis. Circa 1953-1967, the family dwelled in Peoria, Peoria County. He died there in January 1974. Burial was in Parkview Cemetery in Peoria.

Great-granddaughter Ethel Lucille Gaumer (1907-1988) was born on June 17, 1907 in Lawn Ridge, Marshall County, IL. She wedded Herman Kasper Witzig (1904-1968). He died in 1968. Ethel outlived him by two decades. She died in Peoria, Peoria County, IL at the age of 80 on May 9, 1988. She rests for all time in Swan Lake Memory Gardens in Peoria.

Geat-grandson Charles Leroy "Lee" Gaumer (1910-1986) was born in about 1910, probably in Hallock Township, Peoria County, IL. On Aug. 4, 1934, when he was age 24, he was united in matrimony with Mae Harriett Goodwin (Oct. 26, 1914-1993), the daughter of Hiram and Mary (Thomas) Goodwin and a native of Pekin, Tazewell County, IL. The ceremony was held in Peoria Heights, IL. Lee was carried away by the Angel of Death in 1986. Interment was in the American Mausoleum in Peoria. Mae outlived him by seven years. She joined him in death in Peoria on May 7, 1993, at age 78.

Great-grandson Ralph Edward Gaumer (1917-2012) was born on Oct. 12, 1917 in Lawn Ridge, Marshall County, IL. While in early adulthood, Ralph earned income setting pins in a bowling allen, caddying at a golf course and cutting grass. It's said that when the Western Open golf tournament was held at the Peoria County Country Club in 1934, during the grip of the Great Depression, Ralph and a friend set up a soda pop stand on the 13th tee and earned enough funds to travel to the Chicago World's Fair that year. He also worked for Pabst Brewery and Champio Furnace Pipe Company. During World War II, as a member of the U.S. Army Air Corps, he was stationed in Australia and New Guinea and was affiliated with fighter airplanes. On March 2, 1946, in nuptials held in Peoria, Peoria County, IL, he was married to Wilma Jean Grimes (Sept. 12, 1923-2013), daughter of Ervin Andrew and Lora Belle (King) Grimes of Oakville, IA. Prior to marriage, Wilma had been employed in Peoria, IL by General Telephone Company. The couple went on to produce a family of four sons -- Daniel L. Gaumer, Richard Gaumer, Gary W. Gaumer and Randy Lou Gaumer. Sadly, their youngest son Randy died in infancy. The couple dwelled for many years in Washington, Tazewell County, IL. Ralph made a living in sales for a Philco distributor and later as a sales manager with an Admiral distributor. They were members of the First United Methodist Church. Said the Winchester (MA) Star, "An avid reader her whole life, she and Ralph volunteered to help with hundreds of receptions at the church, where she was also involved with many other social and fundraising activities. Wilma also volunteered at the Washington Public Schools and was den mother in the Cub Scout program." Later in life, they were in Massachusetts, where their son Gary was living in the town of Winchester. Ralph died there on May 29, 2012. Wilma only lived for another 13 months. She succumbed to death at age 89, in the Winchester Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, on June 23, 2013. An obituary was printed in the Star, noting that her survivors included nine grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. Her remains were transported back to Illinois to rest in Glendale Cemetery in Washington.

  • Granddaughter Clara Jane Gaumer (1884-1967) was born on Jan. 3, 1884 in Walton, Cass County, IN. At the age of 18, on Jan. 7, 1903, she was united in matrimony with Harry P. Johns ( ? -1933). Their union endured for three decades until cleaved apart by death. They were the parents of an adopted daughter, Freda Eileen Raikes. The Johnses were members of Walton Methodist Church. Harry died just three days after Christmas in 1933. Clara Jane ourlived him by 34 years. Her home in the mid-1960s was with her daughter in Frankfort, IN. Sadly, at the age of 83, Clara died on Sept. 12, 1967 in English Nursing Home in Lebanon, IN. Following a funeral service preached by Rev. Ray E. Mills, her remains were lowered into repose in Deer Creek Cemetery, located west of the town of Onward. An obituary appeared in the Kokomo Tribune.

Great-granddaughter Freda Eileen Johns ( ? -2005) was born on Oct. 5, 1917 in Elkhart, IN. She was adopted by Clara Jane and Harry Johns. On Jan. 7, 1939, she wedded Maurice Raikes (July 2, 1913-2005), son of George W. and Nora (Bowlan) Raikes. Their wedding was held in Walton, Cass County. Two daughters were born to this marriage -- Verna Ritz and Bonnie Nida. Maurice's long career included 25 years with RBM Electronics in Logansport and Lancaster OH, from 1939 to 1964 and then 19 years with Mallory Controls, also known as Mallory Timers, from 1964 to 1983. They lived in Lancaster, Fairfield County, OH for five years before returning to Indiana. He is said to have invented a device for squeezing toothpaste tubes. For 75 years, he sang with various church choirs, including at their family church, St. Matthew United Methodist. Socially, Maurice was a member of the Masons, Lions Club and Order of Eastern Star, while Freda belonged to the Ruth Circle of her church, Ladies Home Economics Club and Eastern Star. The couple made a home in the 1980s at 2452 Wilshire Drive in Frankfort, with both working full or part time for Mallory. When they celebrated their golden wedding anniversary in 1989, at their church in Frankfort, they were pictured and featured in a story in the Logansport Pharos-Tribune. The couple died less than eight months apart. She passed on Jan. 7, 2005, sy shr 87, and he on Aug. 26, 2005, at age 92. They rest in the Odd Fellows Cemetery in Walton, IN.

 

The Henry Moses and Goldie Gaumer family. Back, L-R: Helen and Ruth.
Courtesy Paula (Gaumer) Tooke

 

  • Henry and son Paul, circa 1934
    Courtesy Paula (Gaumer) Tooke

    Grandson Henry Moses Gaumer (1885-1953) was born on March 14, 1885 in Walton, Cass County, IN. In 1900, at age 15, he earned income as a farm laborer in Tipton, Cass County. He is believed to have been married twice. He and his first bride, Margaret Elkins (1886- ? ), tied the knot in 1908 in Grant County, IN. Then when he was 30 years of age, on June 13, 1915, Henry married again to Goldie Myrtle Patton (July 22, 1885-1943). The couple delled in Logansport, Cass County and produced three offspring -- Paul Levon Gaumer, Ruth EileenWolford and Helen Louise Gaumer. Henry was hired by the Pennsylvania Railroad and spent his career there, rising to the position of conductor. He belonged to the Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen, an early union. Sadly, Goldie died on July 8, 1943, bringing to a close their union which had spanned 28 years. Henry's home in the early 1950s was in Logansport at 529½ Heath Street, and he was a member of the Ninth Street Christian Church. On March 30, 1953, he became stricken and was taken to St. Joseph Hospital, where he succumbed a day later, at the age of 68, on March 31, 1953. An obituary was printed in the Logansport Pharos-Tribune. A year after his death, his children took out an "In Loving Memory" advertisement in the newspaper.

Great-grandson Paul Levon Gaumer (1917-1992) was born on Oct. 31, 1917 in Logansport, Cass County. He appears to have spent most of his entire life in the Logansport community. On Feb. 24, 1946, he was united in holy marital union with Leah Jane Winegardner (Oct. 20, 1919-1995). Their wedding was held at the Ninth Street Christian Church, with Rev. Hosier officiating. Two children were born to the couple -- Lee Allen Gaumer and Paula Sue Tooke. His primary employment over the years was as a yard conductor with Conrail. He also joined the Indiana National Guard in the post-World War II era and was promoted to staff sergeant in April 1948. Then in October 1949, he was commissioned as a seecond lieutenant as a motor officer with the Headquarters Company, First Battalion. Continuing his career with the Guard, in late 1952 he was appointed commander of the Tank Company and promoted to captain. The related news and his photograph were printed in the Logansport Pharos-Tribune. Often over the years, he was named in the Pharos-Tribune in connection with his Guard roles. The family were members of the Ninth Street Christian Church, the Orient Lodge of the Eagles, Veterans of Foreign Wars, American Legion, 40 et Eight Voiture and the United Transportation Union. Their address in the early 1990s was 800 19th Street. Sadly, Paul died in Logansport's Memorial Hospital on Feb. 18, 1992. An obituary in the Pharos-Tribune noted that burial was in Mount Hope Cemetery, led by Father Timothy Kroeger and with full military honors. Leah Jane lived as a widow for another three years. She succumbed to death, of congestive heart failure, on Oct. 20, 1995. Their daughter Paula, a dedicated Gaumer genealogist, graciously has shared her research findings for this Minerd.com biography.

Great-granddaughter Ruth Eileen Gaumer (1920-2011) was born in on June 8, 1920 in Logansport, Cass County. At the age of 26, on May 1, 1947, she married Norman Lee Wolford (May 20, 1914-2002). Their nuptials were held at the Ninth Street Christian Church. Two daughter born to this marriage were Marilyn Kay Muniz and Debra Louise Weaver. Their home in 1953 was in Gary, IN. The Wolford were members of the Deep River Church of Christ. The Munster (IN) Times once said of her that she "was very honest, kind and was a very good friend... Her family loved her wonderful pies and chocolate chip cookies." Norman passed into eternity on Nov. 5, 2002 in Hobart, Lake County, IN. Ruth endured for another nine years. She was carried away by the Angel of Death, of congestive heart failure, on Sept. 7, 2011, while a patient at St. Anthony's Hospital in Crown Point, Lake County, IN. Ron Buche led the funeral service with burial in Mount Hope Cemetery.

Great-granddaughter Helen Louise Gaumer (1921-2008) was born on July 18, 1921 in Logansport, Cass County. She does not seem to have married but rather lived with her parents for many years in Logansport. She earned a living over the years with General Tire Company as a quality control inspector. He belonged to the Veterans of Foreign Wars auxiliary i Logansport and the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers Auxiliary. As her health failed in older years, she was admitted to Memorial Hospital in the city. She passed away there on May 17, 2008. Father Tim Kroeger led the funeral service.

 

Logansport, Indiana, Broadway looking east

 

  • Granddaughter Mary A. Gaumer (1886- ? ) was born on Aug. 1, 1886 in Cass County, IN. She appears to have been twice married. Circa 1905, her first spouse was (?) Gause ( ? - ? ). They lived in Indiana and bore a son, Edward C. Gause. The couple divorced by 1910, with Mary and her son moving back into the home of her mother Sarah Bechdol in Gas City, Grant County, IN. Then circa 1911, when she was age 25, she was joined in holy wedlock with Walter B. "Sharpy" Hyson (1875-1938), a native of New Jersey. She was 11 years younger than her husband. The Hysons established a home in New Jersey in the community of Millville, Cumberland County, where he was employed in 1920 as a glassblower at a glass works. Two more children were born -- Margaret A. Bosley and Walter B. Hyson. Evidence suggests that the couple separated during the early 1920s and that in June 1925 she may have married again to William J. Otto Jr. ( ? - ? ), but this is not confirmed. By 1930, Walter was living alone on Second Street in Millville and working as a janitor in the local home of the Eagles lodge. He later joined the lodge. He died at the age of 64 on Nov. 9, 1938, in Millville. Burial was in Mt. Pleasant Cemetery, with an obituary appearing in the Millville Daily.

Great-grandson Edward C. Gause (1905- ? ) was born in about 1905 in Indiana. He was very young when his parents divorced, and he initially went to live with his mother and grandmother in Gas City, Grant County, IN circa 1910. Then after his mother remarried to Walter B. Hyson, they relocated to New Jersey, where he grew up in Millville, Cumberland County.

Great-granddaughter Margaret A. Hyson (1911-1995) was born on Sept. 4, 1911 in New Jersey. She married (?) Bosley ( ? - ? ). She migrated to Buffalo, NY, where she was living in 1938. Then in 1987, her home was in Orchard Park, Erie County, NY. She passed away on March 4, 1995.

Great-grandson Walter B. Hyson Jr. (1919-1987) was born in about 1919 in New Jersey. Circa 1938, at the death of his father, he was in Millville, and spent 40 years in the community. He was joined in wedlock with Lillian ( ? - ? ). The couple did not reproduce. Walter lived for a time in the early 1940s n Lackawanna, NY but later returned to Millville. He was employed at Jersey Package Company and served in World War II, with deployment in Europe. After the war, he joined the Bush-Kerrick Post of the Veterans of Foreign Wars in Millville. Walter died at the age of 68, in Kemore Mercy Hospital in Tonawanda, on Feb. 15, 1987. Burial was in the Elm Lawn Cemetery locally. An obituary was published in the Millville (NJ) Daily.

Son Milton Herman Gaumer (1866-1942) was born on Nov. 27, 1866 in or around Tipton Township, Cass County, IN. He grew to manhood on the family farm and learned the trade of carpentry. In November 1889, when he was 23 years of age, Milton married 20-year-old Mary Elizabeth Coil (July 5, 1869-1926), daughter of Jesse and Caroline A. (Helm) Coil. They made a home in Lawn Ridge, IL and produced eight children -- Mahlon Conover Gaumer, Jesse Milton Gaumer, Homer Joeslyn Gaumer, William "Asher" Gaumer, Harry James Gaumer, Walter Coil Gaumer, Mary Cleo Middleton and Amelia Carol Cheatham. The family grieved at the death of son Jesse at 38 days of age on Sept. 18, 1892 -- son Harry at age two in 1901 -- and at the grisly death of son Asher at age 17 in 1913. He is known to have been sued by Sarah A. Zimmerman in 1896 over a payment dispute involving the sale of land. The case was appealed all the way to the Indiana Supreme Court, was ruled upon in July 1899 and noted in the Logansport Pharos-Tribune. The family relocated to LaPrairie Township, Marshall County, IL and were there in 1900, with Milton continuing his work earning a living as a carpenter. They moved again during the decade of the 1910s to the village of Speer in Valley Township, Stark County, IL, as shown on the federal census enumeration of 1920. While in Speer, he operated a carpentry shop on McKinley Avenue, assisted by his eldest son Mahlon. Sadly, Mary Elizabeth succumbed at the age of 68, in Peoria, Peoria County, IL, on Dec. 17, 1926. Milton spent his final years in Peoria County and died in Lawn Ridge on Jan. 31, 1942 at the age of 75. Interment was beside his wife in Lawn Ridge Cemetery in Marshall County, IL. [Find-a-Grave]

  • Grandson Mahlon Conover Gaumer (1890-1971) was born on April 6, 1890 in Walton, Cass County. Still a bachelor at age 20, in 1910, he assisted his father in the family's carpentry shop in Speer, Valley Township, Stark County, IL. He married his first bride Jessie (1891- ? ), a Nebraska native. Their three children were Mahlon C. "Mel" Gaumer, Mary Frances "M.F" Tance and David Gaumer. Mahlon married a second time in 1946 to school teacher Elsie Dawson (Dec. 8, 1903-1995), a first cousin of his children's. She was a native of Henry, IL and the daughter of Edward E. and Maude E. (Anthony) Dawson. During her teaching career, she had been assigned for 23 years to the Kingman School in Peoria and for another 23 years at Douglas School in Danville. She retired in 1969. They dwelled in Danville, Vermilion County, IL and were members of the St. James United Methodist Church. Mahlon died in Danville on Sept. 24, 1971. As a widow, Elsie relocated to Decatur, IL. She belonged to the American Association of University Women, the Danville Education Association and the Association for Girlhood Education. Toward the end, she became a resident of Lincoln Manor. She passed away in the manor at the age of 91 on Aug. 23, 1995. Interment was in Parkview Cemetery in Peoria. Her obituary in the Decatur Herald and Review said that she was survived by a sister, Edna C. Wilson of Mt. Pleasant, IA and a half-sister Roberta Netzel of Wausau, WI.

Great-grandson Mahlon C. "Mel" Gaumer (1918-2003) was born on Jan. 11, 1918 in Peoria, Peoria County. During World War II, he served in the U.S. Navy. Mahlon appears to have been married twice. With his first bride, they produced a family of children. Later, he was united in matrimony in 1974 with his second wife, Joan ( ? - ? ). Their combined family of children included Mahlon C. Gaumer III, Gregory Gaumer, Mark Blaisdell, Claire Clark, Lynn Coffman, Kathy Conner and Beth Mills. Mahlon was employed for many years in city government and became a popular radio and television personality. He retired in 1988. In about 1991, they relocated to the Escondido suburb of San Diego. He was stricken by heart failure and died at the age of 85 on June 24, 2003. The North County Times of Oceanside, CA published an obituary which said that he had "lived in Escondido for 12 years."

Great-granddaughter Mary Frances "M.F." Gaumer married Tance Fogel. Circa 1995, they were in Coarsegold, CA and 2003 in Walnut Creek, CA.

Great-grandson David R. Gaumer wedded Betty and lived in 1995-2003 in Decatur, IL.

  • Grandson Homer Joeslyn Gaumer (1893-1929) was born on Nov. 17, 1893. At the age of 17, living in Speer, Stark County, IL, he was employed at the local grain elevator. He wedded ( ? - ? ). They were the parents of Mary/Margaret Josephine Gaumer. Sadness blanketed their family when daughter Mary died at age 11 in 1931. Grief again cascaded over the family when, at age 35, Homer succumbed to death on Oct. 25, 1929. His remains were lowered into rest in Lawn Ridge Cemetery in Marshall County, IL.
  • Grandson William "Asher" Gaumer (1896-1914) was born on May 21, 1896 in Illinois. Sadly, at the age of 18, he somehow "fell under a moving train at Peoria," said the Bloomington (IL) Pantagraph, and died of his injuries on Nov. 24, 1914. Burial was in Lawn Ridge Cemetery in Marshall County, IL.
  • Grandson Walter Coil Gaumer (1904-1981) was born on Feb. 25, 1904 in Lawn Ridge, Peoria County, IL. When he was 23 years of age, on June 29, 1927, he was joined in holy matrimony with 22-year-old Gladys Lucille Muszmaul (June 15, 1905-1988). Their wedding nuptials were held in Bloomington, McLean County, IL. The couple's only known son was Richard Gaumer. Sadly, Walter died at the age of 77 in Fort Lauderdale, Broward County, FL on Aug. 30, 1981. Gladys survived him as a widow for seven years. She passed into eternity onMay 26, 1988 in Peoria, Peoria County.

Great-grandson Richard Gaumer (1929-1982) was born in 1929 in Illinois. He died in Fort Lauderdale on March 24, 1982.

  • Granddaughter Mary Cleo Gaumer (1906-1967) was born on Sept. 8, 1906 in Illinois, a twin with her sister Amelia Carol. Mary Cleo was united in wedlock with Vernon Middleton ( ? - ? ). She died in Peoria, Peoria County, IL at the age of about 61 in 1967.
  • Granddaughter Amelia Carol Gaumer (1906-1976) was born on Sept. 8, 1906 in Illinois, a twin with her sister Mary Cleo. Amelia married Charles Henry Cheatham (Feb. 11, 1906-1972). The lone son produced by this marriage was Charles Franklyn Cheatham. They made a home in Peoria, Peoria County, IL. Charles Henry died in Peoria in December 1972. Amelia Carol outlived her spouse by not quite four years. She was carried away by the Angel of Death in Peoria in August 1976.

Great-grandson Charles Franklyn Cheatham (1927-1985) was born on Oct. 6, 1927 in Peoria, Peoria County, IL. In 1950, he wedded Norma Jean Jury (1928-2010), a native of Tiskilwa, Bureau County, IL. Sadly, he passed into eternity at the age of 57 on April 11, 1985 in Peoria. Norma Jean lived on as a widow for another quarter of a century. Death enveloped her in Peoria on Oct. 1, 2010.

 

~ Son Jonathan Gaumer ~

Son Jonathan Gaumer (1831-1889) was born on Jan. 14, 1831 in Macungie Township, Lehigh County.

He married Mary Ann Hersh (1831-1915), daughter of Henry and Polly/Carrie (Shide) Hersch and a native of Mulberry or Upper Hanover Township, Montgomery County.

Their children were Emma Esther Steinberger, Louisa Elisabeth Parker, Ella Mary Kuhns, William H. Gaumer and Ida Rosa Minerva Walters Meitzler.

They resided in the 1850s in Philadelphia, where at least one of their children was born. By 1870, they returned to Upper Macungie. The census-taker recorded that Jonathan had no occupation at that time. Circa 1874 they appear to have lived in Chapmans, Northampton County, PA. Then during the 1880-1889 timeframe, the the Gaumers are known to have been in Fogelsville, Lehigh County, where he generated income as an upholsterer.

 

Fogelsville map, 1862. Courtesy Library of Congress.

 

He may be the same "Jonathan Gaumer" who in 1884 served as elder, with his brother Solomon a deacon, of St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church of Fogelsville, Upper Macungie Township. They are named for this work in the book History of the Counties of Lehigh and Carbon, authored by Alfred Mathews and Austin N. Hungerford (Philadelphia: Everts & Richards, 1884).

Jonathan died in Fogelsville on Dec. 27, 1889.

Mary Ann survived her husband and initially resided in Fogelsville. She is known to have spent the 1895-1896 Christmas/New Year's holiday with her married daughter in Cementon, Lehigh County and had her home in Fogelsville painted while she was away. She later moved into the Walters home. Stricken with cancer of her left breast, she was ill for two years and bedfast for the last 22 weeks of her life.

She passed away in Cementon on Sept. 20, 1915. Interment was in St. Joseph's Lutheran Church burying ground in Fogelsville, with son William Gaumer of Cementon the informant for her death certificate. An obituary in the Allentown Leader said that she was survived by 20 grandchildren and a dozen great-grandchildren. One of their daughters wedded Warren Park and dwelled in Emmaus.

Daughter Emma Esther Gaumer ( ? - ? ) married (?) Steinberger ( ? - ? ).

Daughter Louisa Elisabeth Mary Gaumer (1856-1937) was born on July 17, 1856 in Philadelphia. She was united in the holy bonds of matrimony with Warren H. Parker ( ? - ? ). Circa 1887, the couple made a home in Maple Grove, Berks County. They moved to Emmaus, Lehigh County within a year or two and remained there for the balance of the decades of their lives. They produced a family of children -- Eliza M. "Lizzie" Trout Bunger, Estella Ward, Clara Parker, Herbert Parker, Ira Parker and Harry Parker. In Une 1925, the Parkers are known to have traveled to visit their daughters Estella Ward and Clara Parker in Brooklyn, NY. The widowed Louisa moved into the home of her married daughter Mrs. Harry Trout at 405 Chestnut Street in Emmaus. Suffering from a perforated gall bladder, at the age of 81, she underwent surgery in Allentown Hospital. Sadly, a week later, after contracting pneumonia, she died on Oct. 13, 1937. Burial was in Northwood Cemetery in Emmaus, with Rev. D.E. Schaeffer preaching the funeral sermon. An obituary in the Allentown Morning Call misspelled her mother's first name as "Miriam."

  • Granddaughter Eliza M. "Lizzie" Parker (1885?-1968) was born in about 1885 in Emmaus, Lehigh County, PA. She married Harry E. Trout (May 19, 1886-1939), son of Samuel and Maryann (Lesher) Trout of Richmond Township, Berks County. The couple did not reproduce. The Allentown Morning Call once referred to Eliza as a "lifetime resident of Lehigh County." For many years, Harry was employed by Zollinger Silk Mill in Emmaus. He was a member of the Patriotic Order of the Sons of America (Washington Camp), Mystic Star Lodge of the Odd Fellows and Emmaus Fire Company No. 1. In 1937-1939, they lived at 405 Chestnut Street in Emmaus, Lehigh County, and they belonged to the Ebenezer Evangelical Church of Allentown. Sadly, at the age of 53, Harry was hospitalized in Sacred Heart Hospital in late September 1939 and never returned home. He died there after a stay of several weeks on Oct. 7, 1939. Rev. D.C. Kaufman preached the funeral service, with burial following in Northwood Cemetery in Emmaus. His obituary was published in the Morning Call. The widowed Eliza married again to widower Frank O. Bunger ( ? -1962). He  brought an adult daughter to the union, Mildred I. Schaeffer. In 1949, when named in the newspaper obituary of her sister Estella Ward, Eliza was in Allentown. Their address in the early 1960s was 1447 Chew Street. Frank passed into eternity on Feb. 20, 1962 at the age of 80. His interment was in Greenwood Cemetery. She died in Allentown Hospital at the age of 83 on April 26, 1968. The Morning Call printed an obituary.
  • Granddaughter Estella Parker ( ? -1949) was born on (?) in Maple Grove, Berks County. She wedded Charles Ward ( ? - ? ). They did not reproduce. The couple dwelled in New York City in 1909-1910 and in Allentown in 1912. At some point they relocated to Chicago and were there for three decades, from about 1915 to 1945. In Chicago, she joined the Edith Chapter of the Order of Eastern Star. Circa 1925, they are known to have been in Brooklyn, NY. Estella eventually returned to her home region of Lehigh County, in about 1945, and lived at 801 Chew Street. Sadly, Estella's life came to a close as a patient in Sacred Heart Hospital on Oct. 10, 1949. The Allentown Morning Call published an obituary.
  • Granddaughter Clara L. Parker (1893- ? ) was born in about 1893 in Emmaus, Lehigh County. She never married. Clara and her sister Estella Ward were close, and over the decades they resided together in Chicago and Brooklyn, NY. Ultimately she returned to Lehigh County and in 1949 was in Allentown. Reported the Allentown Morning Call, Clara "was a hostess and waitress at the Americus Hotel, Allentown, for 35 years until retiring in 1968." At the end of her life, she was a resident of Cedarbrook's Fountain Hill Annex. She passed away at the age of 92 on Jan. 12, 1985. An obituary appeared in the Morning Call.
  • Grandson Herbert G. Parker made a home in Allentown.
  • Grandson Ira L. Parker (1890?-1963) was born in about 1890 in Emmaus, Lehigh County. He was united in holy wedlock with Marguerite Laubach ( ? - ? ). The pair did not bear any children. In about 1936, during the depths of the Great Depression, the couple relocated into Allentown, and he secured employment as a press operator with L.F. Grammes and Sons. He held this position for 27 years until retiring in about 1961. Their address in the early 1960s was 26 South 8th Street. Ira died in Allentown at the age of73 on June 15, 1963. An obituary was published in the Allentown Morning Call.
  • Grandson Harry W. Parker (1887-1938) was born on March 26, 1887 in Maple Grove, Berks County. He never married. Harry lived in Emmaus, Lehigh County for some time. He then moved to Bethlehem, Lehigh County, where for 15 years he was a bartender for Benner's Cafe. His address circa 1938 was 623 Linden Street. On the fateful day of May 29, 1938, at the age of 51, he was stricken with heart failure and admitted to St. Luke's Hospital, where he succumbed within the half hour. Burial was in Northwood Cemetery in Emmaus, with Rev. D.E. Schaeffer officiating. The Allentown Morning Call printed an obituary.

 

Center Square in Allentown, PA, showing Koch's Department Store and the war memorial

Daughter Ella Mary Gaumer (1858-1938) was born on Nov. 2, 1858. She wedded Frank R. Kuhns ( ? - ? ). She lived in Allentown, and in the 1930s was with Mrs. George Hoover at the address of 616 Park Street. She was felled by a cerebral hemorrhage in January 1938 and lingered for a few weeks until death swept her away, at age 79, on Feb. 2, 1938. Interment was in Fogelsville Union Cemetery.

Son William H. Gaumer (1863-1916) was born on June 16, 1863. At the age of 17, in 1880, he lived at home in Fogelsville, Lehigh County and labored as an iron miner. He dwelled in adulthood in Cementon, Lehigh County. At his 43rd birthday, in June 1906, a surprise party was held at his home. Said the Allentown Leader, "An excellent dinner was served. Music was rendered by Robert Wenner." William earned a living over the years as a house painter in the Cementon/Whitehall Township area. Sadly at the age of 51, he was diagnosed with chronic kidney disease. After two years of suffering, he succumbed at the age of 53 on Sept. 25, 1916. Ellen J. Gaumer of Cementon was the informant for his official Pennsylvania certificate of death. Interment was in the Egypt Church burying grounds.

Daughter Ida Rosa Minerva Gaumer (1874-1955) was born on April 21, 1874 in Chapmans, Northampton County, PA. She grew up in Fogelsville, Lehigh County. Ida was married twice. She first wedded Ellis J. Walters ( ? - ? ). The couple were the parents of Effie Lindenmuth, Howard O. Walters and Mary Suzanne Walters. Then, on Sept. 24, 1903, she married a second time to L. Herbert Meitzler ( ? - ? ), son of Peter and Catherine Meitzler of Catasauqua. Rev. J.D. Shindle, of the St. Paul's Lutheran Church of Cementon, officiated. Their home for their entire marriage was 122 Willow Street in Cementon, and they belonged to the St. Paul's congregation. They bore three children -- Maybelle Reid, Pauline Snyder and Harold Meitzler. Herbert earned his living for 35 years with Atlas Cement Company of Northampton. Later, he worked for Bethlehem Steel Company and as a painter and paperhanger. The couple celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in Sept. 1953 and were pictured in a story in the Allentown Morning Call. Ida was burdened with heart disease and hypertension, added to senility. She passed away on July 24, 1955, at the age of 81. She rests in Arlington Memorial Park in Mickleys, Lehigh County.

  • Granddaughter Effie Walters married (?) Lindenmuth
  • Grandson Howard O. Walters
  • Granddaughter Mary Suzanne Walters
  • Granddaughter Maybelle Meitzler married (?) Reid
  • Granddaughter Pauline Meitzler wedded (?) Snyder
  • Grandson Harold Meitzler lived at 566 Hazard Road in Palmerton, Carbon County, PA in 1955.

 

~ Daughter Caroline "Carra" (Garmer) Ihrie ~

(Also spelled "Ehrie" and "Erie")

Daughter Caroline "Carra" Garmer (1834-1913) was born in about 1834 in Macungie Township, Lehigh County.

She married Albert "Augustus" Ihrie (1833-1912), with the family surname alternately spelled "Ehrie" and at times shortened to "Erie."

They produced eight known children, Albert N. Ehrie, John A. Ihrie, Elenora "Ella" Grim Otto, Morris B. Ihrie, William Ihrie, Ida Bachman, Annie Wertman and George W. Erie.

Circa 1860, when the United States Census was made, the family lived in Weisenberg, Lehigh County, with Augustus earning a living as a blacksmith.

Then during the 1860s, he began working in local iron ore mines, as shown in the 1870 federal census enumeration.

Augustus' primary occupation was coach making, and he established a reputation in the Hynemansville region where they lived. Then in about 1887, they moved into the city of Allentown. Said the Allentown Morning Call, "After working a short time here he retired from active pursuits."

Caroline was named in a September 1909 article in the Morning Call after attending a reception for her visiting nephew Charles Edward Gaumer, who had migrated to Indiana in 1865, more than 40 years earlier.

The Ihries celebrated their mutual 80th birthdays in August 1911 with a party at the home of daughter Mrs. David Wertman at 536 North Front Street. A related story in the Morning Call provided the names of all of the guests and said that a "lily cake was presented to the aged couple of 80 lilies, [and] numerous presents were also given and refreshments were served."

Sadly, Albert died in the Allentown home of their son George on April 12, 1912, at the age of 79. The viewing and funeral were conducted in the home of son Morris in Allentown. Said the Morning Call, "Interment in Greenwood Cemetery. A trolley car will meet relatives and friends after the services at Sixth and Walnut streets." He was survived by 33 grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren.

 

Allentown, PA as seen from Diehl's Furniture Store

 

The widowed Caroline made her final home at 536 Front Street in Allentown.

Burdened with chronic kidney and heart disease, she died at age 79 on Christmas Day 1913. W.P. Ihrie, of 607 Greenleaf Street, was the informant for the death certificate. Her remains were placed into repose in Greenwood Cemetery.

Son Albert N. Ehrie (1858-1919) was born in Feb. 1858 in Weisenberg, Lehigh County, PA. He married Mary (Keck) Herman ( ? - ? ), whose first husband was Albert Herman. She brought two children to the second union, Alverta Noss and George A. Herman. The couple produced four children of their own -- Charles E. Ehrie, Smatheson Ehrie, Frank Ehrie and Alverta Ehrie. For years, they made a home in Trexlertown, where he earned income as a painter in the employ of Charles Krause of Allentown. The Ehries were members of the Lutheran wing of the Trexlertown Church. Over the decades of his painting work, Albert inhaled significant amounts of fumes laced with lead. He eventually contracted chronic lead poisoning and died at the age of 60 on Jan. 10, 1919. Funeral services were held in the family home and later at their church, with interment in the church cemetery, presided over by Rev. D.C. Kaufman. An obituary was printed in the Allentown Morning Call.

  • Grandson Charles E. Ehrie (1880-1938) was born on April 6, 1880. He was united in holy matrimony with Alice Roth ( ? - ? ). Their only daughter was Arlene Rhoades. The couple lived in Allentown, where for 28 years Charles was employed in the cleaning cepartment of Only Cleaners . Their address was 115 13th Street. Charles belonged to the Greenleaf Beneficial Society of Allentown and socially was a member of the Order of Maccabees. They also were members of the Lutheran congregation of the Maxatawny Church. Sadness blanketed the family on March 19, 1938 when Charles died suddenly at home after being stricken with angina pectoris and hardening of the arteries. Funeral services were conducted in the Ehrie residence and then at their church, led by their pastor Rev. William Dry of Kutztown. An obituary was printed in the Allentown Morning Call.
  • Grandson Rev. Smathason Ehrie (1890-1954) -- also spelled "Smatheson" and "Smatason" and "Erie" -- was born on Feb. 22, 1890 in Berks County. At the age of 19 in 1909, he made a living as a motorman for the Allentown and Reading Trolley Company. On Jan. 25, 1913, Smatheson was united in matrimony with Flossie M. Reppert ( ? -1955), daughter of Milton J. and Ellen Jane (Snyder) Reppert of Wescosville. The ceremony was held in Flossie's home, with Rev. E.O. Leopold officiating, and the news reported in the Allentown Leader. They were the parents of Milton Albert Ehrie, Paul S. Ehrie, Harold Ehrie, Ernest E. Ehrie, Raymond Ehrie, Earl Ehrie and Esther Krause. In his early working career, Smathason was an interior painter and wallpaper-hanger. He and his uncle George W. Erie formed a partnership circa 1922 and established a business named "Erie & Erie." One of their early projects was redecorating the Asbury Methodist Church at the corner of Hamilton and Jefferson Streets. The burdens of the job caused him severe back pain, and he sought relief with Doan's Pills. When the remedy worked, he provided a written testimonial that was used as advertising in the Allentown Morning Call (Feb. 15, 1926):

Heavy lifting weakened my kidneys and I had to get up many times at night to pass the secretions. Knifelike pains in the small of my back took away my energy and sometimes I could hardly work. I was tired, too. I purchased Doan's Pills at the American Medicine Co. and after usign them I was permanently benefitted.

Grief struck the family on May 6, 1915 when their infant son Milton died at the age of one month and 26 days. The baby's funeral service was held in the home of his Ehrie grandparents, with interment in Trexlertown Cemetery. The Ehries dwelled in 1919 in Fullerton, PA and in 1938 in Allentown. Smathason is known to have been an officer with the Allen Ruling of the Fraternal Mystic Circle in 1920. Their residence in 1926 was 817 Greenleaf Street. In 1929, after the death of Flossie's father, she received a payment of $250 from her brothers to relinquish her economic rights to the family's eight-acre farm. Smathason spent his free time as church pastor of the Puritan Methodist denomination. He was active in 1936 with the Non-Sectarian Home Mission, hosting prayer meetings in their home. Circa 1939 he led the 12th Street Baptist Church, and in 1944-1945 pastored the Calvary Church congregation at 951 Oak Street. Their residence in the 1950s was 946 Oak Street, and they were members of the 12th Street Baptist Church. In about February 1954, Flossie suffered a stroke and never recovered, remaining bedfast for the 13 remaining months of her life. During that time, Smathason suffered a heart attack and was rushed to Sacred Heart Hospital on Dec. 14, 1954, where he was pronounced dead on arrival. His remains were interred in St. Paul's Union Church Cemetery in Trexlertown, Lehigh County. Just a little more than three months into her widowhood, Flossie too succumbed to the Grim Reaper of Death on March 24, 1955. Her obituary noted that her survivors included 14 grandchildren.

Great-grandson Paul S. Ehrie (1915?-1986) was born in about 1915 in Allentown. He was joined in holy wedlock with Alfa F. Moser ( ? - ? ). The only son born to this union was Richard Ehrie. They resided at 101 North 7th Street in Allentown. For decades, Paul worked for Kistler's Fire Protectors in Allentown. He retired in 1979. At the age of 72, Paul died at home on April 18, 1986. An obituary was published in the Allentown Morning Call, noting that interment was in Union Cemetery in Lehighton.

Great-grandson Harold Ehrie lived in Allentown in 1955, with a aresidence at 128 South Lumber Street.

Great-grandson Ernest E. Ehrie (1925-2014) was born in about 1925 in Allentown. During World War II, he served with the U.S. Army's 66th Heavy Artillery Division. After the war, he settled in Easton and Palmerton, PA. He was married and the father of three daughters. Sadly, at the age of 89, Ernest died on Christmas Eve 2014.

Great-grandson Raymond Ehrie was employed in 1945 at Phoenix Clothes Inc. He married Jeannine Harlan ( ? - ? ), daughter of Charles D. Harlan. They dwelled in Allentown in 1955.

Great-grandson Earl Ehrie served in the U.S. Army during World War II. Later, he established a home in Phoenixville, PA and was there in 1955.

Great-granddaughter Esther Ehrie was united in wedlock with Donald Krause. They lived in the mid-1950s in Allentown.

  • Grandson Frank W. Ehrie (1883-1952) was born on Christmas Day 1883. He was joined in matrimonial union with Florence Miller ( ? - ? ). The couple's children were Lillian Kincaid and Melba Schuler Boland. The Ehries made a home over the years in Fullerton and Allentown. Frank earned a living in various ways over the years. His final employment was with Allentown Hospital as a fireman. Their address in the 1940s and early 1950s was 144 and 146 12th Street. Burdened with congestive heart failure, Frank died in Allentown Hospital at the age of 68 on March 9, 1952. The remains were lowered into rest in the Trexlertown Church cemetery. An obituary in the Allentown Morning Call reported that he had "lived in Allentown for about 40 years." His survivors included six grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

Great-granddaughter Lillian Ehrie ( ? - ? ) married (?) Kincaid.

Great-granddaughter Melba Ehrie ( ? - ? ) was born on (?). As a young woman, she worked at Benesch's in Allentown. She was twice married. her first husband was Paul B. Schuler ( ? - ? ), son of John B. Schuler of Coopersburg. The wedding was held on April 8, 1944, at the Salem Reformed Church, led by Rev. William Kosman. Paul was employed with Bethehem Steel Corporation. A little more than three years later, on Aug. 7, 1948, she married Francis J. Boland ( ? - ? ), son of Andrew Paules of 1026 Linden Street. The ceremony was officiated by Rev. Robert D. Brodt at Salem Evangelical and Reformed Church. In reporting on the nuptials, the Allentown Morning Call said that Melba "wore a light blue dotted swiss dress with pink accessories and carried pink roses and gladioli. Lillian Kincaid, her sister, who attended her, wore pale pink nylon and carried yellow roses and gladioli."

  • Step-granddaughter Alverta Ehrie ( ? - ? ) resided at home with her parents in Trexlertown in 1919. She wedded Albert Noss ( ? - ? ). Circa 1938, they dwelled in Barto/Niantic, PA.
  • Step-grandson George A. Herman (1878?-1938) was born on July 7, 1878. He married Mahida Person ( ? - ? ). Only one daughter was born to this marriage, Mrs. Harry Stoudt. The Hermans were in Siegfrieds, PA in 1919. George went on to a long career with Universal Atlas Cement Company as a steam shovel fireman. He retired in June 1931 after 20 years in the occupation. They lived in the 1930s at 840 Main Street in Northampton, PA and belonged to the Zion's Stone Church of Kreidensville. George suffered a heart attack in mid-August and he was admitted to Allentown Hospital. He died there a week later at the age of 60 on Aug. 23, 1938. The remains were placed into repose in Allen Union Cemetery in Northampton, with an obituary printed in the Allentown Morning Call.

Son John A. Ihrie (1859-1937) was born on Oct. 10, 1859 in Weisenberg, Lehigh County, PA. He was wedded to Annie Amanda Wink ( ? - ? ), also spelled "Winters." The couple bore at least three offspring -- Ada Ihrie, Annie E. Zettlemoyer and Charles E. Ehrie. John spent his 55-year working career as a house painter in Klinesville, Berks County. In 1930, he and his daughters attended the April funeral of his sister Ida Bachman and also the October funeral of his brother George in Allentown. When the annual family reunion of Amanda's Wink family was formed, in the late 1920s, John served as registrar for the events. Suffering from congestive heart failure as well as kidney problems, John died at age 77 on April 27, 1937. Interment of the body was in Lenhartsville, Berks County, following funeral services held in the Zettlemoyer residence. Son Charles E. Ehrie signed the death certificate. An obituary was printed in the Reading Times.

  • Granddaughter Ada V. Ehrie (1882-1959) was born on May 21, 1882 in Albany Township, Berks County. She never married. She lived at home with her widowed father in 1937, the year he died. Her residence in 1944 was in Lenhartsville, where she spent the balance of her years. She was a longtime member of the First Church of Christ, Scientist, in Reading. Ada enjoyed attending the annual reunions of her mother's Wink family, descendants of Casper Wink. In August 1937, at the ninth reunion, held at Trexler Park near Lenhartsville, she was one of about 300 attendees and served in the role of secretary. She went to live in Berks Heim in Lenhartsville, Berks County, where she spent the last 15 months of life. She succumbed at the age of 77 on Aug. 16, 1959. Franklin Neupher led the funeral service, held in Hamburg, Berks County. The Allentown Morning Call obituary reported that she was survived by her brother Charles and a nephew and niece. Mary E. Green of Greenfields near Reading signed the death certificate.
  • Granddaughter Annie E. Ihrie (1892-1944) was born on Oct. 25, 1892 in Klinesville, PA. Annie married Joel Zettlemoyer (Aug. 26, 1869-1942), the son of William R. and Sarah Ann (Knepper) Zettlemoyer. The bride was 23 years younger than the groom. For 33 years, the couple dwelled on a farm in Lenhartsville, Berks County, PA. Joel suffered a cerebral apoplexy and died six days later, at the age of 73, on Dec. 14, 1942. Burial was in St. Paul's Cemetery. Just a little more than a year later, burdened with chronic heart disease, Annie died at the age of 51 on New Year's Day 1944.
  • Grandson Charles E. Ehrie (1895-1963) was born in about 1895 in Klinesville, Greenwich Township, PA. He was united in holy wedlock with Bertha A. DeLong ( ? - ? ). Their only child was Elizabeth E. Adam. Following the Ihrie/Ehrie family tradition, he earned income over the years as painter and wallpaper-hanger. They belonged to the Lutheran wing of Friedens United Church of Christ in Lenhartsville. They dwelled in 1937 at 241 Greenwich Street in Kutztown, Berks County. Charles was active with the annual reunions of his mother's Wink family, descendants of Casper Wink. In August 1937, at the ninth reunion, held at Trexler Park near Lenhartsville, he served as vice president and was one of about 300 attendees. Later, they moved to 215 East Walnut Street in Kutztown. At the age of 68, Charles was felled by a heart attack and died in St. Joseph's Hospital in Reading on Aug. 15, 1963. An obituary ran in the Allentown Morning Call. Interment was in Friedens Cemetery.

Daughter Elenora Ihrie (1864-1936) -- also known as "Eleanor" - "Ellen" - and "Ella" - was born the day after Christmas in 1864 or 1866 in Weisenberg Township, Lehigh County, PA. As a young woman, she was baptized in the Lutheran church in Weisenberg. She was married twice. Her first spouse was Harrison Grim ( ? - ? ). The couple in 1887 bore a son, Raymond Grim. On Feb. 1, 1890, the 26-year-old Elenora wedded a second time to 24-year-old Benjamin F. Otto (Nov. 1866-1940), son of Samuel and Fianna (Fritz) Otto of Mertztown, Berks County. Rev. O. Leopold officiated, and the news of the wedding was published in the Allentown Democrat. The newlyweds immediately moved into Allentown in 1890 and remained there for good. She transferred her church membership to St. Luke's Lutheran in Allentown. The Ottos were the parents of a son of their own, Charles M. Otto. Said the Allentown Morning Call, she "made a host of friends through her many neighborly and Christian qualities." Benjamin earned a living circa 1900 as a day laborer. Then for 15 years, he was employed by Farr Bros., retiring in 1931. Their home in the mid-1930s was at 519 Chestnut Street. Having borne diabetes and chronic kidney disease, added to a heart attack -- what the Morning Call referred to as "a complication of diseases" -- she died at home at the age of 69 on Aug. 16, 1936. The remains were lowered into eternal repose in Highland Cemetery. Benjamin outlived his bride by four years. While at home in mid-March 1940, he suffered a stroke and a week later was taken to the residence of his brother William in Treichlers. He died there at the age of 77 on March 19, 1940. His Morning Call obituary noted that the funeral was preached by Rev. S. Franklin Custard, with burial in Highland Cemetery.

 

Weisenberg Lutheran Church sanctuary after remodeling in 1928

 

  • Grandson Raymond Harrison Grim (1887-1961) was born on Dec. 4, 1887 or 1888 in Allentown. He learned the vocation of blacksmithing. In his young manhood, in the 1910s and '20s, Raymond was a star local baseball player, receiving the nickname "Chief" and "a sizable Lehigh Valley following," said the Allentown Morning Call. "Most of his sports reputation came from his season with the old Balliet A.C. [Athletic Club]. He was also a member of the Hogan A.A." Raymond wedded Lillian Fried ( ? -1941). They were the parents of Paul E. Grim. They lived for decades in Allentown, where for 45 years Raymond plied his trade as a blacksmith's helper in the Allentown shops of the Central Railroad of New Jersey. Sadly, Lillian died in 1941. Raymond survived her by two decades and endured the untimely death of their only son. He suffered from hardening of the arteries and heart disease and passed away at the age of 72 on Nov. 6, 1961, in the home of his son's widow Mary (McLaughlin) Grim at 432 Ridge Avenue in Allentown. They rest in Highland Cemetery.
  • Grandson Charles M. Otto (1897-1941) was born on Oct. 2, 1897. He was a lifelong bachelor. He made his home in Allentown circa 1936 and was employed in maintenance for the Allentown Call Chronicle newspapers. His address in 1941 was 133 North Fifth Street. Sometime during the latter half of the 1930s, with the nation crushed in the grip of the Great Depression, Charles became unemployed. In his final years, said a physician who examined the situation, he "drank himself into unconsciousness - came to hospital - was not able to remember what happened to him." Also stricken at the time with internal bleeding and an ulcer of his intestines, he passed away on Sept. 8, 1941 at the age of 43 years, 11 months and six days. His half-brother Raymond Grim signed the death certificate. The body was interred in Highland Cemetery.

Son Morris B. Ihrie (1867-1937) was born on Feb. 24, 1867 or 1863 in Weisenberg/Macungie Township, Lehigh County, PA. He earned a living as a young man as a house painter. In 1883, he was joined in holy matrimony with Emma Beck (Sept. 1865-1918), daughter of John and Mary Beck of Breinigsville. They produced a large family of a dozen children -- among the eight known names were John Ihrie, Lizzie Ihrie, Mayne Erie Sr., Morris E. Erie, Arthur Erie, Robert Ihrie, Bessie Erie, Ray Erie and Florence Biever. After about six years of marriage -- at the early stage of what may have been a "seven year itch" -- Morris got into trouble with the law in claims of adultery and false pretenses. The Allentown Chronicle published a story in March 1889 summarizing his story, reprinted in the Lebanon (PA) Daily News:

[He] has made quite a record for himself. Ihrie about six years ago married a young lady from Shamrock, Berks county. He brought his bride to Allentown and the two lived with Ihrie's parents, until a few months ago, when they moved to Lebanon and took up their home with Mrs. Ihrie's folks. The surroundings were not congenial to Ihrie's taste and some time ago he came back to Allentown, leaving his wife and three children at Lebanon. Prior to his departure for Lebanon Ihrie had obtained a lot of goods under false pretences and among those who were his victims are Joseph J. Flickinger, the cigar dealer; Frank Bower, the meat man, and J.S. Goodman, who conducted a jewelry store on Chew street, near Seventh. The amounts are all small. Ihrie also "kept company" with a single girl named Gehringer, living on Union street, at whose boarding place the two officers arrested Ihrie at 11 o'clock on Saturday night. Ihrie insisted that his name was Romit, but finally admitted that these officers had the right man. Three warants for false pretense were served on him and he was taken to jail. The father of the Gehringer girl to-day proferred another charge against Ihrie.

After a hearing led by alderman N.E. Worman, he was held over for trial. Controversy seemed to follow him when, in March 1890, he successfully brought claims against William Bortz for assault and battery. He and Emma reconciled and were together for a grand total of 28 years until cleaved apart by death. They moved into Allentown in 1897 and remained there for good. They were longtime members of Trinity United Evangelical Church. Their address in 1901 was 28 North Sixth Street. Sadness blanketed the family in July 1901 when infant daughter died and was buried in Greenwood Cemetery, with Rev. W.F. Heil officiating. Over time, Morris also rebuilt his public reputation and became a well-known house painter and wallpaper-hanger, operating his business from a home office. Among his customers was the Hotel Penn, where in December 1905 he completed an enlargement and interior renovation, including opening a large window facing Seventh Street. He was a member of the Rescue Hook and Ladder Company and helped make rescues during local fires. In August 1907, in a public test and demonstration of raising a ladder in just five seconds, he "climebed the ladder when set perpendicularly and descended upon the other side," reported the Morning Call. "A number of other stunts were done." Morris appears to have been insolvent in June 1908 when the wallpaper contents of his store at 30 South Seventh Street were sold at a sheriff's sale. Circa 1912, their home was at 616 Walnut Street in Allentown. He moved his store in May 1917 from 506 Union Street to 521 Union Street and announced the relocation in the Morning Call. The story reported that:

The store has been replenished with an entire new stock of wall papers and moulding and among them are the most artistic and tasty wall papers to be formed anywhere. He carries the famous Alfred Peats prize wall papers. These papers are well known throughout the entire country and are favorites. Some of the other papers are made in York. He has thirteen men on his painting and papering force and assures good workmanship. Mr. Ihrie has been in this business for the past thirty years and his large patronage is the best assurance of good workmanship. He will furnish estimates for both interior and exterior work promptly.

 

Allentown Fair, early 1900s, where Morris Ihrie ran a food stand for years

 

Over the years, the spelling of Morris' family surname evolved from "Ihrie" to "Ehrie" and finally "Erie." At the Allentown Fair in September 1914, he generated news in the Allentown Democrat as "another of the grand old men who have been conducting eating stands at the Fair ever since the grounds were opened at Seventeenth and Chew Sts. His menu contains everything for the hungry man, such as Pennsylvania German sour kaut with the right smell, chicken, speck, roast beef, etc." In 1916, the Eries sold their 10-room, brick house and lot to the St. Stephen's Magyar Roman Catholic Church to be remodeled for use as a house of worship. Their home in 1918 was at 521 Union Street. Sadness blanketed the family when Emma passed away of pneumonia in Allentown Hospital on Dec. 18, 1918, just a week before Christmas. Funeral services were held in the family home with Rev. J.D. Kistler preaching, and burial in Greenwood Cemetery, with her six sons serving as pallbearers. Her obituary in the Morning Call noted that among her survivors were her mother, sisters Ellen Fegley and Susan Beck and brother William Beck, all of Lebanon, Lebanon County, PA. Morris outlived his wife by 19 years. After a year of grieving, on April 18, 1919, he wedded a second time to Elizabeth "Lizzie" (Harris) Laubach ( ? - ? ), of Penn and Maple Streets in Allentown. She was the daughter of Milton S. and Ella J. (Mest) Harris. Morris suffered from heart problems and died at the age of 74 on April 24, 1937, while a resident of his son Arthur's home at 845 Maple Street. He was survived by 17 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren as noted by the Morning Call obituary.

  • Grandson John B. Ihrie (1884-1958) was born on Feb. 16, 1884  or 1880 in Allentown. He learned the trade of painting from his father and they appear to have worked together in 1900-1910. John married Greta A. Wilt/Wilkes ( ? -1955). The couple produced three children -- John B. Erie Jr., Margaret Ann Erie and June L. Laub. Census records show that while he was married in about 1909, he lived without his bride in his parents' home in 1910. John went on to a half-century working career as a painting and wallpaper-hanging contractor. His business address was on South Seventh Street, and their home address was 616 North 20th Street. They belonged to St. John''s United Church of Christ in Allentown. "During the prosperous 1920s," said the Allentown Morning Call, "he was subcontractor on many projects resulting in developing of housing areas.... During World War II, he was active in Civil Defense, a leader in the air raid wardens' organization." When his health began to deteriorate in about 1950, he was forced to retire. Just nine days before Christmas in 1955, Greta passed away. He lived on for three years and endured uremia and hardening of the arteries. Death swept him away in Sacred Heart Hospital, on June 19, 1958, at the age of 78. Burial was in Greenwood Cemetery. Their son John was a five-decade diamond and wristwatch merchant in Allentown and died on Sept. 7, 1994.
  • Granddaughter Elizabeth M. "Lizzie" Ihrie (1887-1959) was born on Aug. 3, 1887 in Allentown. She wed Harry F. Berger ( ? -1948), son of Theodore and Clara R. (Trumbore) Berger of Bethlehem. Elizabeth and Harry lived in Fogelsville and Weilersville over the years. Their three daughters were Dorothy Adams, Grace Biever and Ruth Kressley. Harry earned a living over the years as a sheet metal worker for Air Products Company, while Elizabeth was employed by the LV Shirt Company in Allentown, retiring in 1944. She was a member of Lehigh Zion Lutheran Church and active with its Sunday School. She also was a member of the Lutheran Auxiliary and the Ladies Aid Society. Their address in the 1940s was 176 Jefferson Street in Emmaus. After he had suffered with lung cancer, Harry was carried away by the Angel of Death on March 7, 1948. Elizabeth survived him by 11 years. Toward the end, she went into the home of her married daughter Mrs. George Biever in Alburtis. She was afflicted with heart and diabetes problems and died at the age of 71 on May 16, 1959. She rests in Zion Lehigh Cemetery in Alburtis.
  • Grandson Mayne Erie Sr. (1893-1973) was born in July 1893 in Allentown. He too became a painter like his father and older brother John and likewise began spelling the family name "Erie." He was badly injured during a freak accident while at work in early September 1910, at the age of 17. Reported the Allentown Leader, "Young Erie, his brother and another man were high on a scaffold, painting the walls of the Union Mercantile store at Church and Union streets yesterday when a touring car skidded from the middle of the roadway and struck one of the ladders supporting the scaffold, which collapsed. The two othe rmen grasped the other ladder and hung by their arms high in the air, but Main Erie landed head foremost on the concrete sidewalk and suffered concussion of the brain and a fractured clavicle. The owner and driver of the car, who took the victim to the hospital, is Floyd Ramsey, manager and treasurer of the New Jersey Water and Light Company of Deal, N.J." Mayne somehow recovered from his injuries. He went on to a career as a self-employed electrician in and around Allentown and is credited with installing the first electric lighting system in New Tripoli, Lynn Township, Lehigh County. Mayne was joined in wedlock with Martha A.J. Paules ( ? -1959), daughter of tilghman and Jane (Reinert) Paules of Slatedale, PA. The couple bore two sons -- Robert M. Erie and Mayne Erie Jr. The Eries were members of St. John's Lutheran Church, Allentown and resided at 135 North Law Street. The family grieved when Martha succumbed to death at the age of 63 on May 28, 1959. Mayne outlived her by 14 years and retired in 1968. As a widower, he went to live with his son Robert at 1907 Aripine Avenue in Bethlehem. Mayne died in Sacred Heart Hospital on April 24, 1973, at the age of 81. The Allentown Morning Call published an obituary.
  • Grandson Morris E. Erie Sr. (1894-1958) was born on April 5, 1894 in Allentown. When he was age 16, he worked as an apprentice for the Reed Homes Company in Allentown. On April 23, 1916, he wedded Roxie M. Harris (Feb. 16, 1894-1958), daughter of Milton E. and Ella (Mest) Harris of Allentown. Their wedding ceremony was held at the parsonage of the Christ Reformed Church, and officiated by Rev. C.F. Althouse. The couple produced three offspring -- Catherine E.E. Bachert, Mary Jane Day and Morris E. Erie Jr. Their infant son Morris was not destined to reach childhood and died of whooping cough and bronchial pneumonia on May 27, 1932. Morris made a living as a truck driver, employed by the Allentown News Agency. Their home in 1934-1958 was at 528 Hamilton Street, on the third floor. They were in the news in 1934 when celebrating their 18th wedding anniversary. Roxie was a member of the local camp of the Daughters of America. Sadly, death overcame the couple within just six weeks of each other. Having been ill for eight months with hardening of the arteries, Morris was felled by a heart attack and died first, on June 17, 1958. Roxie also suffered a heart attack and followed her spouse into the great beyond, as a patient at Parkway Rest Home, on July 31, 1958 at the age of 64. They are buried at Fairview Cemetery, with respective obituaries appearing in the Allentown Morning Call.
  • Grandson Arthur Erie (1895-1963) was born on Oct. 31, 1895 in Allentown. He married Margaret Yentsch ( ? -1960), a native of Lehighton, Carbon County and the daughter of Gottlieb andMinnie (Simchek) Yentsch. Two sons were born to the union -- Arthur Erie Jr. and Robert Erie. Arthur learned the family's well-established vocation of painting and wallpaper hanging and was self-employed at this trade over the years. Margaret earned a living as chief cook for Hugo's Restaurant. They moved to Allentown in about 1920 and in the 1950s lived at 845 Maple Street. On the fateful day of June 25, 1960, Margaret was at the local Odd Fellows Hall when she suffered a heart attack. She was rushed to the hospital but died en route, at the age of 64. As a widower, Arthur made his residence at 1217 South Lumber Street. He developed diabetes and underwent surgery to amputate the left leg. When congestive heart failure set in, Arthur succumbed to death in Allentown Hospital, at the age of 67, on Jan. 30, 1963. An obituary was published in the Allentown Morning Call. They rest in Grandview Cemetery.
  • Grandson Robert Wilson Ihrie Sr. (1898-1949) was born on June 18, 1898. He was in Allentown in 1918. On Nov. 25, 1922, by the hand of Rev. J.R. Bachman in his home, he was joined in holy wedlock with Marion E. Eck ( ? - ? ). She was the daughter of Albert Eck of 1122 Maple Street. Robert followed the family occupation and earned income over the years as a painter and wallpaper hanger. The couple's son Robert Jr. sadly died at age six months on March 14, 1925. Their address in the 1940s was 28 South Howard Street. Suffering from an enlarged heart, he died just a few weeks prior to his 51st birthday on May 17, 1949. Burial was in Greenwood Cemetery.
  • Grandson Ray W. Erie (1905-1971) was born in 1905. As a young man, he went into business with a brother in a painting and wallpaper-hanging firm. On Aug. 19, 1944, at the age of about 39, he wedded Anna Nancy Rubin ( ? - ? ), daughter of Stanley Rubin of 523 North Third Street. Their civil wedding ceremony was officiated by Allentown alderman Lloyd E. Grammes and reported on the pages of the Allentown Morning Call. Anna Nancy "wore a brown street length dress with matching accessories and a corsage of white roses," said the article. "Mrs. Robert Erie was dressed in navy blue with white accessories. her flowers were pink roses." The couple did not reproduce. At the time of marriage, Anna Nancy worked for Modern Clothing. Ray generated income through his work with Erie Electric Company. He was well known in the community as a founder and manager of the sports division of the Allentown Green Jackets, a semi-professional association for athletics. The Eries dwelled at 844 West Cumberland Street. Ray was admitted to Sacred Heart Hospital and died there, at age 66, on June 29, 1971. An obituary appeared in the Morning Call.
  • Granddaughter Florence Mae Erie (1906-1982) was born in 1906 in Allentown. She was wed to Russell Biever ( ? -1994), son of Daniel and Emma (Angstadt) Biever of Allentown. The children borne to this union were Russell M. Biever Jr., Richard D. Biever and Donald L. Biever. Their longtime home was in Allentown. Russell was employed for 41 years as a machinist with Mack Trucks Inc. in Allentown, working in Plant 3. Active with his union, he served as steward of Local 677. He retired in 1969. The family were members of Grace Lutheran Church of Allentown. Their residence in the early 1980s was 203 West Emmaus Avenue. Sadly, Florence died at the age of 75, in Zohlman Nursing Home, on Feb. 6, 1982. Russell died at the age of 90, in Sacred Heart Hospital, on July 26, 1994. His obituary appeared in the Allentown Morning Call, which noted that he was survived by six grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren.

Son William P. Ihrie (1868-1937) was born on April 18, 1869 in Breiningsville, Lehigh County, PA. He married Annie Parker ( ? - ? ). They were Mennonites and did not have any children. William made a living over the years as a green grocery salesman. His last employer was Troxell and Lentz Company. He retired in 1930 after 14 years of work in the field. Their address in the 1930s was 350 Gordon Street in Allentown. Sadly, William burdened with tuberculosis of the lungs in his late 50s. He struggled with the disease over a decade of time. At the age of 58, William was hospitalized and succumbed to death on Sept. 28, 1937. Burial was in Fairview Cemetery. An obituary in the Allentown Morning Call led with the fact that his was the "third brother in the family to be called in death within six months."

Daughter Ida Ihrie ( ? -1930) was born on (?). She was united in holy wedlock with William Bachman ( ? - ? ). The couple's address in 1912 was Allentown and in 1919-1930 in Orange, NJ. Sadly, Ida died in April 1930. Among those attending her funeral were her brother John and his daughters.

Daughter Annie Marie Ihrie/Ehrie (1870-1921) was born on New Year's Day 1870 in Breinigsville, Lehigh County. Her maiden name also has been given as "Stump." She was joined in the state of matrimony with David A. Wertman ( ? -1927), a native of West Penn, PA. The children born to this marriage were Lillian Wertman, Anna Wertman, Mae Wertman, Dorothy Wertman, William Wertman, Robert Wertman, Mayme C. Brown, Catharine Wertman, Florence Brown, Margaret I. Smith and Edna Betz. Circa 1912-1921, they dwelled in Allentown, at the address of 110 Ridge Avenue. The Wertmans were considered "devout" members of the Lutheran Church. Grief swept over the family in 1915 when unmarried daughter Catharine was afflicted with an appendix infection followed by peritonitis and died at the age of 21. Annie became seriously ill in the autumn of 1921 after having developed a goiter and diabetes, which led to a coma. She thus was confined to bed on or about Nov. 14, 1921. After only two bedfast days, she was swept away by the Grim Reaper of Death on Nov. 16, 1921. An obituary in the Allentown Morning Call reported that Rev. R.H. Ischinger officiated at the funeral service, held in the Wertman residence, with her remains laid to rest in Hillside Cemetery. Now widowed, David lived for another six years and moved in with his married daughter and son in law, the Richard Betzes, at 1954 Lehigh Street in Wilson Borough. He died there, at the age of 74, on May 8, 1927. Funeral services were led by Rev. F.A. Posselt, held in the Betz residence. His obituary in the Morning Call observed that floral tributes provided for the service included a pillow from the children; a wreath from J.B. Buehler and company; a casket spray from the children; snap dragons from B.T. Otto and Son; and a spray from Mr. and Mrs. R.R. Rockingham.

  • Granddaughter Lillian H. Wertman (1903-1968) was born in about 1903 in Allentown. At the age of 24, she was unmarried and in Easton, PA in 1927. Lillian eventually wedded Harvey M. Sell ( ? - ? ). They lived at 25 South 10th Street in Allentown and were members of St. John's Lutheran Church. The only child born into the family was Dottie Messner. When at the age of 65, Lillian died in Allentown Hospital on Jan. 3, 1968.
  • Granddaughter Anna Wertman ( ? - ? ) was born on (?). She was united in holy wedlock with Arthur Kraemer/Kramer ( ? - ? ). They established a home in Matua, NJ and were there in 1968. Then circa 1975-1986, they were in Southern California with a home in San Diego..
  • Granddaughter Mae Wertman was not married in 1927 and was living in Orange, NJ.
  • Granddaughter Dorothy Wertman was single in 1927 and dwelled in Easton, PA. In 1968-1975, still unmarried, she was in Reading, Berks County, PA.
  • Grandson William W. Wertman Sr. (1904-1974) was born in about 1904 in Allentown. He married Margaret B. McGeehan ( ? - ? ). They spent their lives in Allentown, at the address of 229 South Fulton Street. Their brood of children included Bernadine Miller, Gerald W. Wertman, William W. Wertman Jr., Thomas J. Wertman and Joseph R. Wertman. For many years, William worked at the Lehigh Valley Club as a bartender. Socially, he belonged to the Barger Lodge of the Masons. He was felled at the age of 71, on Dec. 2, 1975, and was pronounced dead on arrival at Allentown Hospital. The Allentown Morning Call produced an obituary.
  • Grandson Robert D. Wertman (1907-1986) was born in about 1907 in Allentown. Robert lived in Allentown in the mid-1920s. In July 1936, when he was 29 years of age, he was joined in holy wedlock with Bernice L. Garnet ( ? - ? ). Their marriage endured for half a century until the separation of death. The couple's only known son was Donald R. Wertman. During World War II, he served in the U.S. Navy. After the war, the Wertmans made a residence in Orefield, PA in 1968-1975. Robert's occupation over a 35-year-span was as a press operator for L.F. Grammes and Sons and retired in 1972. The couple were members of the Jordan Lutheran Church, where Robert served for eight years as a councilman. He passed into eternity in Lehigh Valley Hospital Center on March 11, 1986, at the age of 79. An obituary appeared in the Allentown Morning Call.
  • Granddaughter Mayme C. Wertman (1890-1958) was born on Aug. 28, 1890 in Allentown. She wedded Verden C. Brown ( ? -1958), son of Ellen (Erdell) Brown and stepson of (?) Dean. They established a home in Allentown and in the 1950s lived at 620 North Sherman Street. They bore three offspring -- Walter V. Brown, Catherine E. Herman and Florence E. Keller. For a quarter of a century, Verden worked as a molder for Bethlehem Steel Corporation. He was a member of the Allen Council of the United Junior Mechanics and the Bethlehem Steel Company molders' union. The couple belonged to St. Peter's Lutheran Church. Suffering from declining health, he retired in about 1949. Sadly, the couple died a little more than five months apart in 1958. He passed first, at home, on March 11. She continued on until heart disease and diabetes led to death on Aug. 28, 1958. A death notice in the Allentown Morning Call said that burial was in Arlington Memorial Park. They were survived by 14 grandchildren and a dozen great-grandchildren.
  • Granddaughter Catharine Wertman (1894-1915) was born on Jan. 21, 1894 in Allentown. She did not marry. Circa 1915, she earned a living through her work at an Allentown silk mill. At the age of 21, just a month shy of her 22nd birthday, she contracted an acute infection of her appendix. She was admitted for treatment to Allentown Hospital, but there was nothing that could be done. Septic peritonitis set in, and she was swept away by the Grim Reaper on Dec. 21, 1915. The remains were lowered into eternal rest in Greenwood Cemetery.
  • Granddaughter Florence Wertman (1896-1946) was born on Nov. 15, 1896. She married Robert Emmet Brown ( ? - ? ). Circa 1927, they dwelled in Allentown and in the mid-1940s at 2105 Eaton Avenue in Bethlehem. Over the years she contracted diabetes, kidney disease and heart failure. She succumbed to death in St. Luke's Hospital at the age of 49 on Aug. 10, 1946. Her remains were lowered into repose in Hillside Cemetery.
  • Granddaughter Margaret I. Wertman (1898-1965) was born on Feb. 20, 1898. She was joined in wedlock with Andrew G. Smith ( ? - ? ). They lived for decades in Allentown, with an address in the mid-1960s of 502 Riverview Terrace. As a patient in Allentown Hospital, afflicted with hardening of the arteries, she passed into eternity on Jan. 24, 1965, at age 66. Paul Smith, of 1150 Devonshire Road in Allentown, was the informant for the official Pennsylvania certificate of death. She is interred in Arlington Cemetery in Mickleys, Lehigh County.
  • Granddaughter Edna Wertman ( ? - ? ) was united in holy matrimony with Richard Betz ( ? - ? ). Their residence in 1927 was at 1954 Lehigh Street in Wilson Borough.Then in 1968, she was in Reading, Berks County, PA.

Son George W. Erie (1877-1930) was born on Aug. 8, 1877. He followed his brothers' vocation as a house painter and interior decorator in Allentown. In fact, at the end of his life, he was said by a local newspaper to be "one of this city's well known painters and interior decorators." George wedded Amanda K. Druckenbrode ( ? -1955), daughter of John and Mary (Oerschprung) Druckenbrode. Born to this union were four offspring -- Irene Erie, Edith Hacker, George Erie and Edward Erie. In 1912, they lived at 412 Washington Street in Allentown and in 1930 at 6121 North Levan Street. Then in 1922, in partnership with his nephew Smathason Erie, they operated the firm of Erie & Erie. One of their contracts was for the Asbury Methodist Church at the corner of Hamilton and Jefferson Streets. Reflecting the Eries' German roots, they publicized their business in the German-language columns of the Allentown Morning Call. Reported one story, in fractured Pennsylvania-German, "Erie & Erie sin tzwa first class painters un decorators. Sie hen der contract kot for die Asbury Methodist Kerch, Hamilton un Jefferson shtrose. Sie missa gud un reliable sei sonsht hetta sie den job net grickt. Die firm is un ga'macht fon George Erie, os shon 28 yohr uf'm handwerk shafft, un sei nephew, S.A. Erie, os 18 yord experience hot." Sadly, at the age of 53, burdened with hardening of the arteries, George died at age 53 on Oct. 6, 1930. An obituary in the Allentown Morning Call said he "was a native of this section and resided here for many years." Funeral services were held in the Erie home, with burial following in Fairview Cemetery. Amanda outlived her husband by more than a quarter of a century. She belonged to the Dubbs Memorial Evangelical and Reformed Church of Allentown. Late in life, she went to live with her son George at 1333 Linden Street and died in his residence, at age 78, on Dec. 19, 1955. She was survived by five grandchildren and two great-grandchildren as well as three step-siblings.

  • Granddaughter Irene Erie ( ? - ? )
  • Granddaughter Edith Erie wedded William Hacker. They were in Allentown in 1957.
  • Grandson George J. Erie (1916-1957) was born on Jan. 26, 1916 in Allentown. He married Dora M. Nickles ( ? - ? ). They were the parents of five -- Charles Erie, Melvin Erie, Robert Erie, Katherine Erie and Sandra Solomon. During his working career, he was employed as an air conditioning division foreman of Bethlehem Steel Corporation. They were members of the Church of Latter Day Saints, and George belonged to the Harugari Home Association, Fearless and Liberty Fire Companies in Allentown, the Abruzese Society and the Bethlehem Young Men's Association. The Eries dwelled at 1333 Linden Street, Allentown. At the age of only 41, he was felled by a heart attack and was admitted to Allentown Hospital and died there on Nov. 13, 1957. His obituary was printed in the Allentown Morning Call, and the remains were lowered into repose in Grandview Cemetery.
  • Grandson Edward Erie ( ? - ? )

 

~ Son Samuel Gaumer ~

Son Samuel Gaumer (1835-1873) was born on  May 9, 1835 in Macungie Township, Lehigh County, PA.

On Feb. 27, 1859, when he was 23 years of age, Samuel married 21-year-old Helena Heilman (Feb. 1837-1916), daughter of Tobias and Elizabeth (Fries) Heilman.

They produced these known sons -- Edwin E. Gaumer, Franklin C. "Frank" Gaumer, Amos Gaumer, George Gaumer and Emma Gehringer. Sadly, their son George died at just one week of age, on Oct. 18, 1866. The baby's remains are at rest in Ziegel's Union Church Cemetery in Breinigsville.

The United States Census of 1860 shows the family living in Upper Macungie Township, with Fogelsville as their post office, and with Samuel plying his trade as a carpenter.

Samuel also was a farmer, and this was marked as his occupation in the federal census enumeration of 1870, also of Upper Macungie. That year, the family's post office was in Trexlertown.

Sadly, Samuel passed into eternity on March 16, 1873, at the age of about 38. The cause of his untimely death is not yet known. [Find-a-Grave]

Helena outlived her spouse by 42 years. In 1880, census records show Helena sharing an Upper Macungie household with her bachelor sons Edwin and Franklin, both laborers. After Edwin was married and bore two children, Helena lived under their roof as shown in the 1900 census. She was a member of the Lutheran congregation of Ziegel's Church.

Suffering from chronic kidney ailments and dropsy (congestive heart failure), Helena went to live with her son Edwin at Newton near Breinigsville. There, she died just a few weeks before her 79th birthday on Jan. 21, 1916, in Upper Macungie. Interment was in the cemetery of her church, with Rev. Frank Keller preaching the funeral service. Edwin Gaumer of Breinigsville signed the death certificate. Obituaries in the Allentown Leader and Allentown Morning Call noted that she was survived by four grandchildren, two great-grandchildren and her twin sister, Mrs. Peter Leiser of Trexlertown.

Son Edwin E. Gaumer (1860-1939) was born on March 19, 1860 in Upper Macungie Township, Lehigh County. Single at the age of 20 in 1880, he and his brother Franklin and widowed mother resided together in Upper Macungie, with Edwin working as a laborer. He was a lifelong farmer. In 1885, at the age of 25, Edwin wedded Sarah E. Fenstermaker (July 9, 1858-1935), daughter of Thomas and Catharine/ Caroline (Deibert) Fenstermaker.The couple produced two children -- Charles W. Gaumer and Carrie H. Fegley, born eight years apart. They dwelled on a farm in Upper Macungie in 1900, with Edwin's widowed mother, Sarah's widowed father and two servants in the household. Grief enveloped the family when son Charles died of typhoid fever at the age of 17 in February 1903. Then on March 12, 1908, Edwin sold the contents of their farm, in preparation for a move to Newtown, advertising the sale in the Allentown Morning Call. At the time, their home was at the intersection of the road from Allentown to Kutztown and from Ziegler's mines to Ziegel's Church, on the Grim farm. Among the livestock up for bidding were four horses, sorrel horses, bay horses, 15 milch cows, two heifers, a stuck bull, 20 shoats and 50 hens. The tools included a Fleetwood separator with side straw carrier, Tornado feed cutter, fanning mill, one horse power with Universal jack for four to six horses, a 70-foot-long belt, a wood self binder, wood mower, hay rake, hay tedder, two four-horse wagons two sets of hay ladders and bolsters and a grain drill. Other tools included a hayfork with pulley and rope, land roller, two spring harrows, two Oliver steel beam plows, two spike harrows, two one-horse cultivators, two sets of heavy harness, four fly nets, collars, bridles, lines, halters, forks, rakes, shovels, grubbing hoe, log, cow and other chains and six milk cans. At the same time, Edwin engaged carpenters B.F. Becker and Eugene Miller to remodel his buildings in Newtown. The Gaumers dwelled in Newton near Breinigsville, Lehigh County for the rest of their lives. They belonged to the Lutheran congregation of Ziegel's Church, and Edwin was active with the Home Department of the Zion Union Church Sunday School. In about 1929, Sarah is believed to have suffered a stroke but survived. She lingered for six years before the Angel of Death carried her away on Nov. 17, 1935. Her remains were lowered into eternal repose in Zeigels Church Cemetery, with Rev. Donald Englert and Rev. J.F. Keller co-officiating at the funeral. The Morning Call noted that floral tributes included a casket spray from Edwin, pillow from daughter Carrie and her husband, wreath from the grandchildren, sprays from the Home Department of Maxatawny Zions Church Sunday School and from the Thomas Hesses, Harry Hesses, William Lichtenwalners, Paul Millers and Edwin's niece Mrs. Samuel Gehringer Jr., with the slumber robe provided by the family. Edwin lived for another four years after Sarah's death and lived in the home of his married daughter Carrie in Trexlertown, retiring from farming in 1936. He bore a number of ailments, among them heart decomposition, enlarged prostate, cystitis and bronchitis. He succumbed to death at the age of 78 on Feb. 15, 1939. Daughter Carrie Fegley of Trexlertown provided details for the certificate of death. Burial was in Ziegel's Cemetery, Breinigsville, with his pastors Englert and Keller again co-officiating. In an obituary, the Morning Call said that he "had been ill for two weeks and was bedfast a week." [Find-a-Grave]

  • Grandson Charles W. Gaumer (1886-1903) was born in Feb. 1886 in Upper Macungie. He grew up in the Rothrocksville area. Tragically, at the age of 17, he contracted typhoid fever, and died soonafter, on Feb. 1, 1903. A one-paragraph obituary in the Allentown Leader said that Rev. O. Leopold preached the funeral sermon at the Ziegel Church, followed by interment in the church's burying ground.
  • Granddaughter Carrie H. Gaumer (1894- ? ) was born in July 1894 in Upper Macungie. At her 27th birthday in 1921, a surprise party was held in her honor, with a number of relatives and friends present. Said the Allentown Morning Call, "A fine dinner and supper was served by Mrs. Gaumer. They enjoyed the day very much. Games were played and music was furnished on the Victrola. They stayed till a late hour in the evening. She received valuable presents." She eventually married Harvey H. Fegley (1890- ? ). The family made a home at Trexlertown, Upper Macungie Township. They were the parents of three known children -- Lillian Sechler, Clarence Fegley and Irwin Fegley. Federal census records show that in 1940, Harvey earned a living as a hired hand, with son Clarence working as a laborer with a linoleum contractor, son Clarence as a laborer at Greenwood Cemetery and son-in-law Sechler as a laborer at Allentown Hospital.

Great-granddaughter Lillian Gaumer (1915-2007) was born in about 1915 in Breinigsville. She married Clinton Sechler ( ? -1987). They were the parents of Clinton A.H. Sechler, Donald L. Sechler, Larry D. Sechler and Patricia A. Dini. In 1940, the family lived with Lillian's parents in Trexlertown, with Clinton earning a living as a laborer at Allentown Hospital. Lillian also generated income for almost three decades as an assembler for General Motors at its Allentown manufacturing plant. They were members of St. Paul's United Church of Christ in Trexlertown. Sadly, Clinton passed away on May 24, 1987. Lillian outlived her spouse by 30 years. She died at the age of 92, in Kutztown Manor in Berks Couinty, on May 10, 2007. Her burial was in the church's cemetery, according to an obituary in the Allentown Morning Call.

Great-grandson Irwin C. Fegley (1916-1981) was born in about 1916. Single at the age of 24 in 1940, he labored for Greenwood Cemetery in Allentown, where many generations of near and far Gaumer cousins rest for all time in the ancient soil. Irwin was joined in marriage with Mary E. Heller ( ? - ? ). The only child born to this union was a son, Dale I. Fegley. Their address in the early 1980s was at 115 Beech Street in Fleetwood, Berks County. For many years, he earned a living working for A.R. Hoffman Inc. in Fleetwood, retiring in 1980. From 1970 to 1974, he made a name in the public eye as a Fleetwood councilman. The family were members of St. Paul's Lutheran Church of Fleetwood. At the age of 65, on April 7, 1981, Irwin became seriously ill at home and was rushed to Reading Hospital, where he was pronounced dead on arrival. An obituary was published in the Allentown Morning Call, which misspelled his mother's miaden name as "Dummer."

Great-grandson Clarence Fegley (1920- ? ) was born in about 1920. A bachelor in 1940, at the age of 20, he worked as a laborer for a linoleum contractor in Trexlertown. His fate has not yet been learned.

Son Franklin C. "Frank" Gaumer (1862-1892) was born on April 28, 1862 in Upper Macungie Township, Lehigh County. When he was age 19, unmarried in 1880, he earned a living as a laborer and shared a home with his widowed mother and bachelor brother. Frank is believed to have married Kate "Katie" Motz (Nov. 1864- ? ), daughter of Gideon and Viola Motz, also spelled "Moatz." The couple produced one son, William F. Gaumer, who allegedly died in infancy in 1884. They resided with her parents in Breinigsville. In about 1886, at the age of 24, Frank went to work as a miner in a iron ore bed owned by Jesse Laros between Breinigsville and Fogelsville. While at work one day, he fell and sustained a painful bruise on his thigh, an injury which ultimately led to his untimely death several years later. His case was reported on in detail several times on the pages of the Allentown Democrat, pointing out that death would result if he did not undergo an amputation. One article, printed as an obituary on Nov. 23, 1892, summarized the context of the issue and reported that after suffering the initial injury:

He however quickly recovered from the effects, and resuming work the happening was seldom revived in his memory. Later he however quit at Laros' and entered the employ of his brother-in-law, Mr. Philip Motz, as mining boss in an ore bed near Breinigsville, and it was there he commenced occasionally to experience severe pains in the leg injured years before. He however believed them to be of a rheumatic order, not thinking it possible that the bruise of way back could be the producing cause. But yet such really proved to be the case. His pains grew steadily in intensivy, even though he was applying household remedies, and at times was treated by his family physician. He however kept at his post of duty in the mine, even though he was seldom without pain in the limb. His condition and sufferings finally became of such a character that on a Saturday morning some six or eight weeks ago he asked of brother-in-law Motz a leave of absence for the day, as he wished to go to Allentown to see Dr. C.H. Schaeffer, of No. 130 North Seventh street, concerning the ailment he was suffering from. His request was of course granted, and on submitting his case to the Doctor, and a thorough examination  of the seat of trouble being made, it was found that a ridge or swelling on the leg near the thigh was nothing other than a saucomous or cancerous tumor, so far advanced that no time could be lost in amputating the limb, owing to danger of the disease rapidly extending to his abdomen. He at once called Dr. Fegely, of the sixth ward, and the latter fully coincided with his views. The patient was then told that taking off the leg was the only hope of saving his life. The sufferer expressing his assent to have the operatin performed and Prof. John Di4ever, of the Med. Dept. of the old University at Philadelphia was at once summoned by telegram to come to Allentown next day for amputating the limb. Reaching here he was taken to Breinigsville by the physicians named, but then it developed that the unfortunate man had while on his way home and during the night in reflecting and contemplating over what had been toldhim come to a determination not to have the operation performed, regardless of results, he asserting that he preferred to go to his death rather than wander about in a helpless manner with one of his legs off at the thigh. So resolutely had he decided upon this that prior to the arrival of the expected surgeons on the day appointed for their coming that he instructed his brother-in-law not to permit them under any consideration to proceed with the surgical operation agreed upon, since he expected that in the preliminary work of determining the real character of his affection he would be placed under the influence of anaesthetics, and that possibly he might not return to consciousness in time to enter a protest. After the arrival of the surgeons Prof. Diever expressed a desire to thoroughly examine the diseased limb, and to do so the patient was etherized, and the tumorous formation slit open from point to point, and the case found to be precisely as diagnosed by the town surgeons. To save the man's life, they then, in accordance with the wish of the patient as expressed by himself, proposed to go ahead with the work of amputation, but Mr. Motz then made known the orders given him in the morning, and though he concurred in the views of the case entertained by the surgeons he to hold faith with the then unconscious brother-in-law, much to his own regret had to refuse his consent to the taking off of the leg, his believe then being that after the man had recovered his consciousness and returned to a realizing sense of his condition would give in to what the needs of the case demanded. The surgeons of course had no objections to interpose, and departed. On the unfortunate man coming to and being told of all that had happened he unexpectedly remained firm in his determination to resist the cutting off of the leg -- death being his expressed preference, and very naturally his case went from bad to worse until finally the great Destroyer came to his relief... Deceased was a good, steady, hard-working man from his early youth up, highly esteemed by all knowing him, and his early death is greatly mourned.

Frank was only 30 years of age at death, which occurred on Nov. 14, 1892. H's funeral was held at Ziegel's Church in Breinigsville, with Rev. O. Leopold preaching the funeral sermon. In the years following, Katie remained in her parents' tenant home on the farm of Jesse Breinig and generated income as a dressmaker. She is shown there in 1900 when the United States Census was taken, and endured her father's death in Nov. 1900. She moved into Allentown by 1901 and made news in the gossip columns of the Allentown Leader when returning to visit her widowed mother, with her family name misspelled "Moatb." Her fate is unknown.

Son Amos Gaumer (1864- ? ) was born in about 1864 in Upper Macungie Township, Lehigh County. He has not been located on the U.S. Census of 1880, when he otherwise would have been 16 years old, and this may indicate he was already deceased. More research on Amos needs to be completed.

Daughter Emma Gaumer (1864-1935) was born on May 3, 1864 in Upper Macungie Township. In about 1885, when she would have been age 21, Emma married 25-year-old Samuel Franklin Gehringer Jr. (Feb. 3, 1860-1938), son of Samuel and Catharine (Kline) Gehringer Sr. and a native of Berks County. The couple bore four offspring -- Katie Snyder, Samuel Franklin Gehringer III and Emma Gehringer and a son who was deceased by 1900. Samuel earned a living over more than 50 years as a school teacher and a road supervisor. Among the schools where he taught were Miller's (1909, 1914) and Weisenberg (1913). Federal census records for 1900 show the family living in Upper Macungie, with Samuel employed as a teacher. At Christmas in 1915, his grammar school students in Fogelsville presented him with a turkey. Circa 1916-1935, the Gehringers made a home in Haafsville near Breinigsville, Lehigh County. They were longtime members of Ziegel's Church. When Samuel's parents celebrated their golden wedding anniversary in October 1907, he and Emma and their children are known to have attended the party. They also went to a 28th birthday party for their niece Carrie (Gaumer) Fegley at Newtown in August 1921. On the afternoon of Oct. 6, 1935, the 71-year-old Emma was critically injured in an automobile accident near Lyon Valley, Lowhill Township. Reported the Allentown Morning Call, "a coal truck forced the car in which she and her husband were riding off the highway.... The car struck a wooden fence and upset. Mrs. Gehringer suffered a fractured hip, lacerations and bruises and was in a serious stage of shock. It was thought she would recover, however until Friday when her condition became worse." She was admitted to Allentown Hospital but could not recover, and died six days later on Oct. 12, 1935. An obituary was printed in the Morning Call. Funeral services were held in the family church with interment following in the adjacent cemetery. Samuel lived for another three years. During that time, he was afflicted with non-malignant tumors on his bladder, extensive internal bleeding and chronic kidney disease as well as hypertension and anemia. He succumbed to the Grim Reaper of Death at the age of 78 on Dec. 4, 1938. His remains also were lowered into rest in Ziegel's Church Cemetery, Breinigsville.

  • Granddaughter Katie H. Gehringer (1894-1981) was born in July 1894 in Haafsville. She was united in holy matrimony with Calvin L. Snyder (1883?-1969), son of Levi and Emmaline (Hartline) Snyder. The couple did not reproduce. They were lifelong farmers in the Kutztown/Weisenberg area. She was a member of Ziegel's Lutheran Church in Breinigsville and was active with the church's Ladies Aid Society and Home Department. Calvin on the other hand belonged to the United Church of Christ congregation of Ziegel's Union Church. Calvin retired in about 1959. He died at home at age 86 on Oct. 3, 1969. As a widow, Katie became a resident of Berks Heim in Reading and died there at the age of 87 on May 21, 1981. Funeral services were held in Ziegel's Union Church, Breinigsville, and an obituary was printed in the Allentown Morning Call.
  • Grandson Samuel Franklin Gehringer III (1897-1984) was born in March 1897 in Upper Macungie, a twin with his sister Emma. On April 3, 1920, the 23-year-old wedded Helen M. Moyer ( ? - ? ), a native of Weisenberg Township and the daughter of Daniel and Mary (Walbert) Moyer. Their union endured for 64 years, minus two days. One daughter was born to the couple, Marie Smith. The Gehringers lived in Breinigsville in 1935-1938 and in Fogelsville in the 1980s. For 25 years, from about 1939 to retirement in 1964, Samuel was employed by Lehigh Portland Cement Company in Fogelsville. They belonged to Ziegel's Lutheran Church, Breinigsville. Sadly, Samuel was admitted to Lehigh Valley Hospital Center and died at the age of 87 on April 1, 1984, two days away from what would have been their 64th wedding anniversary. An obituary was printed in the Allentown Morning Call.
  • Granddaughter Emma Gehringer (1897- ? ) was born in March 1897, in Breinigsville, Upper Macungie, a twin with her brother Samuel. Emma never married. Her residence in the mid-1930s was in New Tripoli and in the 1970s in Orefield. She was a member of Ziegel's Lutheran Church. At the age of 79, as a patient in Allentown Osteopathic Hospital, she passed into eternity on March 14, 1977. The Allentown Morning Call ran an obituary.

 

~ Daughter Sarah Ann "Sally" (Gaumer) Wiltrout ~

Daughter Sarah Ann "Sally" Gaumer (1837-1917) was born on Oct. 27, 1837 in Macungie Township, Lehigh County.

On March 13, 1859, in Maxatawny, Berks County, she was joined in wedlock with William Wiltrout (1835-1900), a native of Greenwich Township, Berks County who had migrated to Upper Macungie in young manhood.

They produced these known children -- Ellen A. "Ella" Landis, William "Alfred" Wiltrout, Dr. Frank A. Wiltrout and Lilly D.S. Landis.

William, said the Allentown Leader, was "one of the best known housebuilders and contractors in the interior of Lehigh County.... He was an excellent carpenter, having a most thorough knowledge of his trade. For at least 35 years he was a boss carpenter and contractor and he built hundreds of houses and barns in the Whitehalls and Macungies."

 

Jordan Lutheran and Reformed Church

In the mid-1890s, the Wiltrouts lived in Litzenberg, Upper Macungie. Then in January 1899, for the sum of $1,000, William bought the farm of Moses Hoffman across the road from the Jordan Lutheran Church near Guthsville in South Whitehall Township. The family moved to a new home at that place in the spring. Their youngest daughter Lilly, an invalid, lived with them.

Suffering from heart problems and congestive heart failure, William died at age 65 in April 1900. The story generated a headline in the Leader. When told the news, said the Leader, daughter Lilly "went into convulsions.... On her account, lest she should be disturbed, the church bell has not been tolled for her father's death, an extraordinary omission from a custom sacred in the country districts." Funeral sevices were held at the Jordan church, with Rev. Semmel preaching the sermon.

Sarah Ann survived for 17 more years. In the immediate months after becoming a widow, she held a public sale of her farm and household goods. Son Alfred is known to have purchased the frame house, three-acre lot and a six-acre tract of woodlands for the price of $1,275. The sum represented a 27.5 percent return on the late father's investment from the year before.

She made a home with her married daughter Ellen Landis in Guthsville in 1905. That autumn, she suffered serious injuries when she fell headlong down a flight of steps and was knocked unconscious. She was treated by Dr. M.J. Kline of Orefield, who told a correspondent for the Allentown Morning Call that she might not recover. But she lived for another dozen years after the incident.

Sarah Ann was named in a September 1909 article in the Morning Call after attending a reception for her visiting nephew Charles Edward Gaumer, who had migrated to Indiana in 1865, more than 40 years earlier.

In 1915, feeling she was not adequately supported by her adult children, she filed a legal claim against them, alleging she was indigent. Circa 1917, she resided with the Landises at 1950 Chew Street in Allentown. On June 25, 1917, she suffered a stroke and died. Burial was in Jordan Lutheran Cemetery. Daughter Ellen signed the death certificate. An obituary in the Leader said that she was the daughter of "the long deceased Mr. and Mrs. Solomon Gaumer." [Find-a-Grave]

Daughter Ellen A. "Ella" Wiltrout (1860-1926) was born on Dec. 3, 1859. Single at age 20, in 1880, she earned a living as a milliner maker (women's hats). At the age of about 25, in 1885, she married a cousin, Jacob P. Landis (March 23, 1864-1949), son of Israel and Sarah (Gaumer) Landis of Walberts, PA. One known child was born to the union, Mabel Landis. They dwelled in 1900 on a farm in Wennersville, South Whitehall Township, with Ellen's widowed mother and disabled sister Lilly in the household. Then in 1914, having lived as tenant farmers on property owned by Ed Bortz, in between Wennersville and Walbert's, he announced a public auction to sell his valuable farm stock. The advertisement which ran in the Allentown Morning Call listed the goods up for bid: five good working horses, 75 shoats weighing between 30 and 100 lbs., sows with litters, boars, chickens, two-horse wagon, Turner Favorite Fertilizer, seed drill, Champion binder and grass mower, riding cultivator, two Syracuse Plows, spring harrow, hay fork, corn planter, sheller, wheelbarrows and "good as new" Essex incubator holding 160 eggs and Cyphers incubator holding 240 eggs. He also offered a brooder, Humphrey's green bone grinder, corn grinder, hay ladders, heavy harnesses, collars, fork and "many other articles to numerous to mention." After the sale, the couple moved into the city of Allentown, where in 1917 their address was 1950 Chew Street. The Landises moved again to a home along Spring Creek in Macungie and were there in 1926. They were members of Jordan Lutheran Church. At the age of 66, Ella was felled by a cerebral hemorrhage. She lingered for nine days and died on Oct. 29, 1926. Her remains were placed into rest in Jordan's Lutheran Church Cemetery, with Rev. Ehner Leopold preaching the funeral sermon. An obituary in the Morning Call reported that her funeral was "well attended by relatives and friends." Floral tributes included mixed flowers from Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Landis, chrysanthemums from her sister Lilly and the J.H. Smith family, chrysanthemums and flowers from Ulysses Schmoyer and a slumber robe from her husband. Jacob survived as a widower for another 23 years. He relocated into Allentown in 1936 and made a living at Trexler Lumber Company, first in the lumber yard and later as a watchman. His final residence was with his grandson Russel N. Landis at 1423 Liberty Street in Allentown. Having become senile, and burdened with hardening of the arteries, he contracted pneumonia and became bedfast. Three weeks later, he succumbed to death on March 5, 1949, just 18 days shy of his 85th birthday. Burial was at Jordan's Lutheran Church Cemetery, with an obituary appearing in the Morning Call.

  • Granddaughter Mabel Landis (1889-1946) was born on Dec. 12, 1889 in Allentown. Prior to marriage, circa 1904, she gave birth to a son, Russel N. Landis. She later married Clarence J. Deshler (1889-1960). Their home was in Allentown at 818 North Eighth Street. The children born to this union were Verna I. Dottery, Arlo J. Deshler and Kenneth H. Deshler. Mabel made news in October 1910 when she and her aged grandparents were visiting in her parents' home, alone, located on the corner of Chew and 20th Streets. Flames broke out on the second floor. Said the Allentown Morning Call, she "tried to extinguish the fire with water and was overcome by smoke in the room. She was saved by neighbors." On May 4, 1946, having borne asthma and chronic heart disease, Mabel died at home at the age of 56. Interment was in Grandview Cemetery. For the next 14 years, Clarence outlived his bride and resided at 905 North Sixth Street. He died at the age of 70 on Feb. 19, 1960.

Great-grandson Russel N. Landis (1904-1972) was born in about 1904. He married Elda S. Heilman. Russel was employed as a supervisor with the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation and was active politically as treasurer of the Mid-County Republican Club. He died on July 3, 1972.

Great-grandson Kenneth H. Deshler lived in Allentown in 1972.

Great-granddaughter Verna I. Deshler wedded (?) Dottery. Her home in 1972 was in Allentown.

Son William "Alfred" Wiltrout (1861-1935) was born in 1861 or 1862. He learned his father's trade of carpentry, and in 1880, at age 19, worked in that occupation over time. Alfred married Judith Dietz (Oct. 28, 1868-1960), a native of Akron, Summit County, OH and the daughter of Ferdinand Dietz. They produced three sons -- Ferdinand W. Wiltrout, Frank Wiltraut and Harold Wiltrout. He relocated to Ohio and was in Akron, Summit County in 1894-1900. After his father's death in 1900, and the subsequent sale of the widowed mother's property, Alfred spent $1,250 to acquire her frame house, three-acre lot and a six-acre tract of woodlands. Difficulty seemed to stalk the Wiltrouts on this property. In April 1901, their pigsty burned to the ground, killing two pigs. Reported the Allentown Leader, "The barn and other outbuildings standing close by were saved by heroic efforts, the strong wind fortunately blowing the angry flames from the barn." The family was the victim of a theft in 1904 when an itinerant clock repairman stopped at the farmhouse and asked the son to summon the mother. As the boy went upstairs, the visitor then stole her purse from the cupboard. The thief was apprehended in Friedensville. Then in August 1908, in a trade with Colonel Trexler, he relinquished the farm and acquired the Hill Side Hotel in Snydersville. Alfred's married sister Lilly Landis and her husband Edgar then acquired the farm from Trexler in exchange for their house and lot in Guthsville. The hotel property included a large icehouse in which could be placed 60 tons of ice. In February 1922, he sold his household and farm goods at the hotel, advertising the auction in the Allentown Morning Call. He offered these items for sale -- five bedroom suits, chairs, rockers, tables, stoves, carpet, rugs, dishes and kitchen utensils. Stated the advertisement, "No meals served. Conditions made known on day of sale. No hucksters." From there the Wiltrouts moved to Fullerton, Lehigh County, where they remained as of 1930. The couple were members of St. John's Lutheran Church, Fullerton. He was afflicted with heart and kidney disease and bronchial asthma and, at age 73, died on Jan. 8, 1935. An obituary in the Morning Call noted that funeral services were held in the family home and later at their church, with Rev. Waldemar Buch preaching. Pallbearers included members of the Claussville Castle of the Knights of the Golden Eagle. The widowed Judith resided in Fullerton at 425 Sixth Street in Whitehall Township. She endured the untimely death of her adult grandson Moulton A Wiltraut in September 1960. Burdened with heart disease, she was stricken with heart failure and was gathered in by the Angel of Death just two days before Christmas 1960. Interment was in Hillside Cemetery in Fullerton.

  • Grandson Ferdinand W. Wiltrout (1894-1941), also spelled "Wiltraut," was born on May 28, 1894 in Akron, Summit County, OH but grew up in Lehigh County. At the age of 14, in June 1909, he was riding his bicycle in Snydersville when, said the Allentown Democrat, "the front wheel broke throwing the lad on the face, rendering him unconscious and disfigured him. Dr. Kline found it necessary to stitch the wound." Ferdinand was united in matrimony with Phronia Kriner ( ? - ? ), daughter of John and Anna (Guth) Kriner. The couple were the parents of six known children -- Mrs. Stanley Brinkman, Mrs. Walter Buckfeller, Ferdinand W. Wiltrout Jr., Richard Wiltrout, Arlene Wiltrout and James Wiltrout. For 25 years, the couple made a home in Fullerton, Lehigh County, and their address in 1941 was 447 Waverly Avenue. Ferdinand was employed as a night clerk and watchman for the Pennsylvania State Highway Department garage along the Emmaus Pike. The family belonged to St. John's Lutheran Church of Fullerton. For two decades, he suffered from a goiter and for 10 years from heart valve which pumped insufficiently. Sadly, a week before his 47th birthday, he died at home on May 21, 1941. Burial was in Arlington Memorial Park, with an obituary printed in the Allentown Morning Call.
  • Grandson Frank E. Wiltraut (1889-1961) was born on July 14, 1889 in Akron, Summit County, OH but grew up in Lehigh County. He married Mary A. Kline (March 2, 1893-1958), daughter of Moulton J. and Ella (Balliett) Kline of Hoffmansville. Three known children were born to this marriage -- Frank E. Wiltraut Jr., Moulton A. Wiltraut and Erema Snyder. The Wiltrauts lived in Hoffmansville, Lehigh County in 1916. They relocated in about 1925 to Fullerton, where they spent the rest of their lives, with an address in 1961 of 425 Sixth Street. He earned a living as a draftsman for Mack Manufacturing Company, where he spent a three-decade career. The family belonged to St. John's Lutheran Church in Fullerton. Socially, Frank was a member of the Blue Lodge of the Masons in Trexlertown. Their home in 1958 was in Orefield. Sadly, Mary began to display a form of paranoia and dementis which caused senility. She also bore heart disease for many years and died after a heart attack, at age 65, on May 31 ,1958. At the age of 72, Frank suffered an acute heart attack and was admitted to Sacred Heart Hospital, where he passed into eternity on Nov. 20, 1961. His remains were lowered under the sod in Hillside Cemetery, and an obituary appeared in the Allentown Morning Call.

Great-grandson Frank E. Wiltraut Jr. lived in Douglassville, Berks County in 1960.

Great-grandson Moulton A. Wiltraut (1916-1960) was born on Aug. 22, 1916 in Hoffmansville, Lehigh County and named after his maternal grandfather, Moulton J. Kline. He wedded Naomi Kuhns ( ? - ? ). The couple produced four offspring -- Jeffery Wiltraut, Scott Wiltraut, Susan Wiltraut and Karen Wiltraut. The family established a residence in Fullerton at 429 Jefferson Street. For many years, he was employed as superintendent of Ludlow Manufacturing Company's Allentown plant. Then in about 1956 he accepted a position as production scheduler for Bethlehem Steel Corporation at its Machine Shop 6. The Wiltrauts were members of St. John's Lutheran Church in Fullerton, and Moulton was active with several Masons lodges. In early September 1960, Moulton was admitted to Allentown Hospital and passed away there two days later, on Sept. 7, 1960. An obituary was published in the Allentown Morning Call.

Great-granddaughter Erema Wiltraut married John Snyder. In 1960, they dwelled in Allentown.

  • Grandson Harold Wiltrout ( ? - ? ) was born in (?). A tumor having developed on one of his legs as a child, he underwent surgery in a Philadelphia hospital. In adulthood, he established a home in New Tripoli and was there in 1941.

Son Dr. Frank A. Wiltrout (1863-1930) was born in about 1863 in Upper Macungie. He grew up with a father and older brothers who were carpenters, and he also learned this skill as a young man. But upon attending Keystone Normal School at Kutztown, he decided to pursue a career as a veterinarian. Frank graduated from Ontario Veterinary College in Canada and established a surgeon's practice in Hazleton and later in Wilkes-Barre, Luzerne County. Frank was united in the holy bonds of wedlock with Jennie Green ( ? - ? ). The couple adopted a daughter, Stella Bunk. He remained in his profession in Wilkes-Barre for more than three decades and was active in the Masons lodge and Iron Temple of the Shrine. The family were Lutheran in their faith. In about 1910, he retired and returned to his roots in Breinigsville. At the age of 67, he died in Allentown Hospital on May 17, 1930. Burial was in Mountain View Cemetery in West Hazleton, with Rev. Wesley Wenner officiating at the funeral service. An obituary was printed in the Allentown Morning Call.

  • Adopted granddaughter Stella Wiltrout ( ? - ? ) was born on (?). On July 7, 1922, she married Samuel Bunk. The couple were the parents of a son, Philip Bunk. They relocated to Southern California, and circa 1930, their home was in Long Beach, CA. The Bunks appear to have moved back to Shady Corner near Breiningsville circa July 1932. They eventually separated, with Samuel leaving their home. She returned to Breinigsville and sued him for libel in June 1945.

Daughter Lilly D.S. Wiltrout (1879-1949) was born in Nov. 1879. She was considered an invalid and lived at home in 1899-1900 across the road from Jordan Lutheran Church. When her father died in April 1900, said the Allentown Leader, she, "went into convulsions" when told the news.  "On her account, lest she should be disturbed, the church bell has not been tolled for her father's death, an extraordinary omission from a custom sacred in the country districts." Then when the family farm was sold later in the year, Lilly and her mother moved in with Lilly's married sister Ellen Landis. Lillie eventually married Edgar G. Landis ( ? - ? ) and dwelled on a farm in Guthsville. She bore two known sons, Raymond Frank W. Landis and Paul Alfred V. Landis. In August 1908, after Lilly's brother Alfred sold the family farm to Colonel Trexler, she and Edgar bought the farm property from the colonel in exchange for their house and lot in Guthsville.When mentioned in the 1930 Allentown Morning Call obituary of Lilly's brother Dr. Frank A. Wiltrout, their address was 11141 Green Street in Allentown. Despite her disabilities, Lillie became a licensed practical nurse and was employed in the field for years. They were members of the Jordan church and belonged to its Young People's Society  and Sunday School Home Department. Socially, she was a member of the Lincoln Herd of the Ladies Independent Order of Reindeer. In back-to-back losses in 1942-1943, she shouldered the deaths of both of her adult sons. Circa 1949, they were in Orefield. She died just a few weeks shy of her 70th birthday on Nov. 13, 1949. Burial was in Grandview Cemetery in Allentown, and an obituary was printed in the Morning Call.

  • Grandson Raymond Frank W. Landis (1902-1942) was born on Aug. 22, 1902 in South Whitehall Township. At the age of 17, in 1920, he was employed as a salesman in a furniture store, likely the C.A. Dorney Furniture Company where he is known to have worked later. He married Minnie P. Ritter ( ? - ? ). Said the Allentown Morning Call, the couple "lived for a time in Centre Valley, later moving to Allentown. After six and one half years here they relocated in Coopersburg, then moved back to this city..." In Coopersburg, he served for eight years on the board of directors of the Coopersburg Moravian Church. Then in Allentown, he accepted a position as tax collector for the Allentown School District. Tragically, Raymond developed a brain tumor in about 1939, the same year the Landises moved to 1828 Pennsylvania Street in Allentown. After also suffering from respiratory failure, he died at age 39 on Jan. 6, 1942. Burial was in Grandview Cemetery, with Rev. Edwin Sawyer leading the funeral service. His obituary appeared in the Morning Call.
  • Grandson Paul Alfred V. Landis (1905-1943) was born on June 1, 1905 in rural Orefield, Lehigh County. He was joined in wedlock with Viola E. Stettler ( ? - ? ). The couple established a home in Northampton, Northampton County, at the address of 433 East Fourth Street. Paul contracted a toxic staph infection just before Christmas 1943. As shock set in, he was admitted to Sacred Heart Hospital. Three days later, his body gave up, at age 38, on Dec. 26, 1943.

 

~ Daughter Amanda (Gaumer) Koch ~

Daughter Amanda Gaumer (1840-1914) was born on March 26, 1840.

In 1859, when she would have been 19 years of age, Amanda married 23-year-old Charles L. Koch (April 1836-1901).

The couple adopted two daughters, Amanda Koch Dangler and Lizzie B. Koch, born about a dozen years apart.

Charles was drafted into the Union Army during the Civil War, on Nov. 8, 1862, and placed into the 176th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company D. Among his fellow soldiers in the same company were his wife's brother Benjamin Lewis Gaumer and cousin by marriage, Tilghman H. Beisel. He held the rank of sergeant. He was discharged on Aug. 18, 1863.

Charles was a longtime stone mason. The family dwelled in 1870 in Lower Saucon Township, Northampton County, PA, where he plied his trade. By 1880, he had accepted a new job as a laborer at a furnace in Coplay, Lehigh County, where the couple lived in 1880.

The Allentown Morning Call once reported that his built up a business around his skills and that "for some time [he] had a large number of men in his employ."

On Aug. 1, 1890, Charles was awarded a military pension as compensation for his service as a soldier. [Invalid App. #886.299 - Cert. 627.787] That same year, he was enumerated on the special census of Civil War veterans and their widows, but did not report having any sort of disability. He was a member of the Yeager Post of the Grand Army of the Republic, a veterans' organization.

The couple relocated into Allentown in about 1893, with an address of 731 Gordon Street.

Census records for 1900 show Charles continuing to earn a living as a stone mason, while 23-year-old daughter Lizzie worked as a stripper in a cigar factory.

Sadly, Charles contracted the grippe during the first week of the new year in 1901. His health plummeted quickly, and he died on Jan. 11, 1901. Funeral services were held in Zion's Evangelical Church, with Rev. J.E. Beam and Rev. Bliem co-officiating. Among those attending was his nephew James J. Houser. His remains were placed into honored repose in Greenwood Cemetery, with a firing squad presented by the Sons of Veterans organization and fellow GAR members serving as pallbearers. His obituary in the Morning Call said that in addition to his wife and daughters, he was survived by five siblings -- John Koch of Allentown, Caroline Warner of Lower Saucon, Matilda Knauss of Harrisburg, Catharine M. Houser of Bucks County and Susan E. Kuntzman of Wasser, Berks County.

Amanda then applied for and was awarded his pension, and received monthly government checks for the rest of her life. [Widow App. #733.444 - Cert. 508-258]

Amanda lived for another 14 years as a widow. Her residence in the 1910s was with daughter Lizzie at 731 Gordon Street in Allentown.

Having suffered from chronic kidney disease, she was stricken with paralysis at the age of 75. She lingered for about six months and succumbed to death on July 12, 1915. Interment was in Greenwood Cemetery, following funeral services held at the Zion Evangelical Church on Liberty Street. An obituary in the Allentown Morning Call said that death was due to "a complication of diseases" and named her daughter and three surviving siblings, Benjamin, Sarah Ann and Solomon. The family learned that they could be reimbursed for some of her burial expenses, as a Civil War widow, and received $50 from the County of Lehigh.

Adopted daughter Amanda Koch (1864- ? ) was born in about 1864. She wedded (?) Dangler ( ? - ? ), also spelled Dengler. In 1901, the couple lived in Allentown. Amanda is believed to have been deceased by 1915, but this is not proven.

Adopted daughter Elizabeth B. "Lizzie" Koch (1876-1943) was born on Dec. 20, 1876 in Philadelphia. She never married. In 1905, she and (?) Grub bore a son, Charles W. Grub/Koch. At the age of 23, in 1900, she lived at home and earned income as a stripper in an Allentown cigar factory. Then in 1910, still sharing a home with her mother and son, she made a living providing housework for others. When in her 60s, in the 1940s, her address was with her son at 138 North Lumber Street in Allentown. Suffering from an ulcer which perforated her intestines, she was stricken with acute peritonitis and rushed to Allentown Hospital, where she died within three hours, at the age of 66, on Sept. 18, 1943. Her remains were loweered into repose in Greenwood Cemetery. An obituary was printed in the Allentown Morning Call.

  • Grandson Charles W. Koch (1905- ? ) was born in about 1905 to parents who were not married. As a boy he went by by his father's surname of "Grub" but eventually took his mother's maiden name of "Koch." On Sept. 7, 1935, he married Marguerite Hower ( ? - ? ) and they were the parents of one daughter, Elizabeth Florence Koch. Circa 1937-1943, the family dwelled at 138 North Lumber Street in Allentown.

 

~ Son Solomon Gaumer ~

Son Solomon Gaumer (1842-1920) was born on May 22, 1842 in Macungie Township, Lehigh County.

When he was age 21, on Dec. 12, 1863, he married 19-year-old Anna "Maria" Caroline Hartman (Aug. 1844-1922), daughter of Jacob and Magdalina (Raub/Rauch) Hartman of Lehigh County. The nuptials were held at Weidasville, with Rev. O. Leopold officiating.

Among their 10 children were Amanda Katherine Eisenhard, William Gaumer, Alice M. Held, Solomon Charles Gaumer, Laura Deily Roth, Anna "Annie" Schaffer, Elda Pole, Catherine Sara Miller, Jennie M. Smith and Horace Franklin Gaumer. All grew into adulthood except for one.

When the federal census enumeration was made in 1870, the Gaumers were listed as living in Upper Macungie Township, likely in Fogelsville.

The 1880 United States Census also shows the family in Fogelsville, with Solomon working as a contractor. Over the years, he also earned a living as a "stationary engineer," an operator of machinery or equipment.

He is thought to be the same "Solomon Gaumer" who in 1884 served as deacon, with his brother Jonathan an elder, of St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church of Fogelsville, Upper Macungie Township. They are named for this work in the book History of the Counties of Lehigh and Carbon, authored by Alfred Mathews and Austin N. Hungerford (Philadelphia: Everts & Richards, 1884). Then in 1907, Solomon was elected president of the church's Sunday School.

In January or early February 1896, Solomon was badly injured in a freak accident. Reported the Allentown Morning Call, he "had the misfortune of falling backwards from an ice wagon, in consequence of which he has been unable to leave the house since." Just a few weeks later, the family was plunged into mourning when their nine-year-old, youngest son Horace contracted scarlet fever and died.

Maria and her relatives and neighbors enjoyed socializing at what were known as carpet rag parties -- coming together to compare and trade remnants of carpet and rugs for adaptation into new uses, usually with a meal or refreshments involved. In January 1898, she attended one such party at the home of Mrs. Will Reinhard in company with her daughter Jennie and son Will.

Solomon was a 48-year member of the Macungie Lodge and Lehigh Encampment of the International Order of Odd Fellows in Fogelsville, including service as an officer in 1900. He provided janitorial services for the IOOF facility for part of that time.

Solomon and Maria were honored with a surprise party in May 1899 in celebration of his 57th birthday. Said the Morning Call, they "received many valuable presents." Among the attendees were Mr. and Mrs. George Schaffer, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Held, Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Deiley, Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Gaumer, Mr. and Mrs. Clinton Gaumer, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Gaumer, Mr. and Mrs. Howard Miller, Freddie Schaffer, Frank Schaffer, Fred Held, Raymond Deiley, Willie Gaumer, William Pole, Raymond Gaumer, Ambrose Buck, Elda Gaumer, Jennie Gaumer, Mamie Deiley, Florence Gaumer, Leah Gaumer and Ruth Wilson.

Solomon was employed in 1900 as a laborer at a local clay works, the Keystone Fire Clay Company. He sustained a bad cut of his left arm at work in September 1901 when trying to slice a rope. He went to work in the spring of 1907 for James A. Keifer, who was in the process of installing an ochre mill near Fogelsville. Said the Morning Call, Solomon was hired as an engineer and "has experience in this line of business."

The Gaumers bore the agonizing, March 1902 death of married daughter Annie Schaffer when an oil lamp exploded, covering her with burning oil, leading to death a few hours later. A month later, they moved into a house formerly occupied by Edgar G. Held and family, who had moved to Tatamy.

In January 1903, Maria and her daughters Jennie and Alice attended the funeral of Maria's brother, Joseph Hartman, a popular hotel keeper, photographer and grocer, considered "one of the best known men in Allentown." That August, they attended a family reunion held at the Oliver Deily home at 145 Hamilton Street.

Solomon made news again in February 1911 when he and Seth Wendling received a contract to remove all of the apple trees in an orchard owned by Edward Kramlich, to be sold to a factoring making wooden handles.

When celebrating their golden wedding anniversary a few months in advance in 1913, in August, the family held a party at Dorney Park. An article in the Democrat named each attendee and reported the following:

Surrounded by children, grand-children, great grand children, son-in-law, and friends, the aged couple who are remarkably well preserved, reviewed the smiling faces of their dear ones and received the congratulations of all, who were honored to be present. No formal program was prepared. The family came together to commemorate the 50th wedding anniversary of the venerable couple and left the day open for whatever diversions the park afforded. During the course of the dinner. Mr. Solomon Gaumer was presented with a purse of $60 in gold by his children and friends, also a diamond sun-burst ring, and his wife a golden bracelet. The table was decorated with golden rod, marigold and sunfloers and presented a very pretty sight.... The afternoon was spent in exchanges of greetings among the large family. Supper was served at five o'clock and the party adjourned, extending the father and mother their heartfelt wishes for many years of usefulness.

Once retired, Solomon and Maria left the farm to make extended visits with their adult children living away, including the winters of 1913-1914 -- 1914-1915 -- and 1915-1916 -- in Allentown and Ambler, Montgomery County.

In June 1917, Solomon signed an affidavit in support of his brother Benjamin's efforts to obtain a Civil War pension.

Their married daughter Catherine Sara Miller hosted a 78th birthday dinner for Solomon in May 1920, just a few months prior to his death.

Solomon died two weeks after suffering a stroke in Fogelsville, Upper Macungie on Aug. 8, 1920. Burial was in Fogelsville Cemetery. Said the Morning Call, "He had been in ill health for the past two weeks, but two weeks ago suffered a stroke of apoplexy, since which time he has been bedfast and almost helpless. When a young man he was a stationary engineer, but of late has been doing odd jobs." His survivors included 22 grandchildren and 15 great-grandchildren. Fellow members of the Odd Fellows attended the funeral as a body, with members serving as pallbearers and conducting their own burial ceremony in Fogelsville Cemetery. Rev. Frank Keller officiated.

Among the floral tributes at Solomon's funeral were a sheaf of wheat provided by the children; dahlias and bouquet from neighbors; a slumber robe from friends; roses fro mnear friends; gladiolas from grandson Fred Held; gladiola from son-in-law George Schaffer; dahlias from Hunsicker and family and from granddaughters Margaret and Anna Smith.

Maria only lived for another two years, alternatively living with her daughter Alice Held and also Laura Deily at 1126 Oak in Allentown. Suffering from diabetes, she passed away in the Deily residence on Sept. 16, 1922. Funeral services were held at the Fogelsville home of her daughter Jennie Smith. Rev. Keller again preached the funeral sermon.

 

Fogelsville landmark Shankweiler's Hotel, famous for chicken and waffle dinners

 

Daughter Amanda Katherine Gaumer (1864-1940) was born on April 17, 1864 in Lehigh County. She married Hiram Eisenhard (March 26, 1851-1928), son of Benjamin Eisenhard. They were farmers for years and lived in Ambler, Montgomery County, PA in the 1910s and 1920s. Their eight offspring were William F. Eisenhard, Mrs. Homer Fluck, Harvey Eisenhard, Solomon Eisenhard, Lucy Eisenhard, Milton Eisenhard, Hiram Eisenhard Jr. and Luther Eisenhard. Census records for 1900 show Hiram's occupation as an engineer in a tannery and in 1910-1920 as a watchman in the tannery. Amanda and daughter Lucy and son Milton went to the Gaumer family reunion in August 1903, held at the home of her sister Laura Deily in Allentown. The entire family also attended the 50th wedding anniversary party of Amanda's parents in Allentown in 1913. Hiram was felled by a stroke of apoplexy on or just after Christmas 1926. He lingered for 26 days until the Grim Reaper of Death cut him away, at the age of 74, on Feb. 22, 1926. His remains were interred in Rose Hill Cemetery. The widowed Amanda outlived her spouse by 14 years and remained in Ambler, on Dreshertown Road. She suffered from congestive heart failure and heart disease and passed into eternity on July 10, 1940, at the age of 76. One of the daughters wedded Homer Fluck.

  • Grandson William F. Eisenhard (1887?-1970) was born in about 1887 in Ambler, Montgomery County. On June 26, 1907, at the age of 20, he was united in holy wedlock with Emma Beck ( ? - ? ). Their wedding was held in the local Lutheran Church parsonage, led by Rev. Charles W. Jeffries. The couple "lived in the same house for 62 years," reported the Doylestown Daily Intelligencer, at the address of 87 North Hamilton Street. They were the parents of Mrs. Ernest Wright and Mrs. Edward Ervin. Early in his working career, William was a trolley operator for 17 years on a route to Willow Grove. He later was employed for 22 years by the Borough of Doylestown and then for six years for the Woolworth's store. As a young woman, prior to marriage, Emma had lived in New York City, where she learned the trade of dressmaking, "and her first job was working on dresses for Mrs. Theodore Roosevelt," said the Intelligencer. After marriage, she earned income of her own as a forelady at Doylestown Manufacturing Company. The Eisenhards were members of St. Paul's Lutheran Church. William retired in 1958 and spent his remaining years raising flowers and cooking, since Emma was not able to stand for long periods. Although both were semi-invalids at the time, they celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary in June 1967 and were pictured in a feature story in the local newspaper. The article said that while she "must remain lying down much of the time, [Emma] does like to crochet and just made an afghan for her five-month-old great-grandson." William died on March 28, 1970 at the age of 83. An obituary in the Intelligencer noted that he was survived by six grandchildren and 17 great-grandchildren. Rev. Wilson Hartzell preached the funeral sermon, with interment in Doylestown Cemetery.
  • Granddaughter Eva L. Eisenhard (1889- ? ) was born on Jan. 1889. When she was age 21, in 1910, she resided at home and was employed as a wrapper at a chemical manufacturing factory.
  • Granddaughter Mamie M. Eisenhard (1889-1958) was born on Nov. 22, 1889. She married Bertram P. Beideman ( ? - ? ). She spent her final years in North Wales, Montgomery County. She passed into eternity on March 14, 1958.
  • Grandson Harvey H. Eisenhard (1893- ? ) was born on Feb. 1893. In 1920, a bachelor at the age of 27, he lived at home and worked in an automobile garage.
  • Grandson Solomon B. Eisenhard (1894- ? ) was born on Sept. 1894. He wedded Emily (1896- ? ). In 1920, they made a home with Solomon's parents in Ambler, with Solomon working as a farm helper.
  • Granddaughter Lucy E. Eisenhard (1899- ? ) was born on Feb. 1899.
  • Grandson Milton E. Eisenhard (1901-1967) was born on Aug. 4, 1901 in Ambler. In 1920, at age 18, his occupation was as a hardware salesman. He eventually married Ruth ( ? - ? ). Their residence was in Meadowbrook Avenue in Ambler. Milton continued his work for many years as a clerk in a hardware store. At the age of 65, on May 27, 1967, he died in Philadelphia's Chestnut Hill Hospital after suffering from heart disease and then a heart attack. His burial was held at the Chruch of the Brethren Cemetery in Ambler.
  • Grandson Luther Eisenhard (1902? - ? was born in about 1902.
  • Grandson Hiram W. Eisenhard (1907-1962) was born on Feb. 11, 1907 (also shown as 1901 in some records). He died in Norristown, Montgomery County on Jan. 23, 1962.

Son William Gaumer (1883-1938) was born in about 1883. He was married and in 1908-1913 dwelled in Bethlehem, Lehigh County. By 1920, he had relocated to Cetronia, PA. He married and was the father of three sons -- Robert Gaumer, John Gaumer and Solomon Gaumer. After the marriage ended, his address in the later 1930s was by himself in the rear of 1126 Oak Street, Allentown. He was a longtime painter, but in the midst of the Great Depression of the 1930s, was unemployed for several years. During the wee hours of Jan. 9, 1938, after he had decided to end his life, he went into Dorney Park and jumped into the frigid waters of the boating lake, where he quickly froze to death. Eight hours later, the upward-facing body was spotted by local resident Bernard Kline. He "called city police who broke the thin ice which covered the pond and pulled the body to the bank," reported the Allentown Morning Call. "Coroner [Alexander] M. Peters, M.D., viewed the body and issued a certificate of death by suicide."

  • Grandson Robert Gaumer served in the U.S. Marines circa 1938.
  • Grandson John Gaumer resided in Allentown in 1938.
  • Grandson Solomon Gaumer was in Allentown in the late 1930s.

Daughter Alice M. Gaumer (1866-1939) was born on Feb. 19, 1866 in Upper Macungie, Lehigh County. She wedded Frank J. Held ( ? - ? ). They relocated to Allentown in 1908 and remained for good. The couple were the parents of Fred S. Held. In about 1929, Alice moved into her son's home at 1209 Chew Street and was there for the last decade of her life. She was a longtime member of St. Stephen's Evangelical Lutheran Church, located at the corner of Turner and Franklin Streets, and was active in its English Bible class. After an illness of about two months' duraation, she died on May 16, 1939. Funeral services were held in her church, with interment following in Fogelsville Cemetery. An obituary was published in the Allentown Morning Call.

  • Grandson Fred S. Held ( ? - ? ) lived in Allentown at 1209 Chew Street in 1939.

Son Solomon "Charles" Gaumer (1869- ? ) was born in about 1869 in Lehigh County. He moved into the city of Allentown, the county seat, as a young man. At the age of about 24, two days before Christmas 1893, Solomon was joined in the bonds of marriage with Cora Scheirer ( ? - ? ). Rev. M.J. Kramlich officiated, and the news was announced in the Allentown Leader. Circa 1902, he was employed as a lineman with the Pennsylvania Telephone Company and lived in Allentown. He relocated to Great Plaines (?) and was there as of 1913. His home in 1920 was in Bridgeport, CT.

Daughter Laura Gaumer (1871- ? ) was born in about 1871 in Fogelsville, Upper Macungie Township, Lehigh County. Evidence suggests that she married Oliver Deily ( ? - ? ) with a residence of Allentown. The couple bore two known sons, Raymond Deily and William Deily. By 1938, she had married again to Frank Roth ( ? - ? ).

Daughter Anna Gaumer (1874-1902) was born in about 1874 in Fogelsville, Upper Macungie Township, Lehigh County. She was united in wedlock with George Schaffer ( ? - ? ). The couple established a home in the borough of Alliance, six miles from Allentown along the Lehigh River. They bore two sons, Fred Schaffer and Frank Schaffer. On a tragic day in March 1902, the 29-year-old Anna and her mother-in-law were at home together by themselves. As Anna went to turn down a hanging oil lamp in the dining room, "it exploded and splashed the burning oil all over her," reported the Allentown Democrat. "J.M. Newhard and Preston Deibert, who heard a commotion and rightly judged some one was in distress, ran into the house and smothered the flames.... She was so severely burned that death ensued after the woman had endured some hours of terrible suffering." Her charred remains were lowered into eternal sleep in Fogelsville. George remained close with his in-laws and is known in August 1913 to have attended their 50th wedding anniversary party, held in Dorney Park.

  • Grandson Fred Schaffer (1894- ? ) was born in about 1894. He was only age eight when his mother died.
  • Grandson Frank Schaffer (1898- ? ) was born in about 1898. His mother died when he was only age four.

Daughter Elda Gaumer (1876- ? ) was born in about 1876 in Fogelsville, Upper Macungie Township, Lehigh County. She was joined in holy matrimony with William Pole ( ? - ? ). The couple produced one daughter, Helen Pole. Their address in 1913-1939 was in Ambler, Montgomery County.

Daughter Catherine Sara Gaumer (1879- ? ) was born in about 1879 in Fogelsville, Upper Macungie Township, Lehigh County. She married Howard Miller ( ? - ? ). The children born to this marriage were Sterling Miller and Helen Miller. Their home in 1902 was in Northampton, Northampton County and in 1914 in Siegfrieds, PA. In May 1920, now living at 1519 Washington Avenue in Northampton, they hosted a 78th birthday dinner for Catherine's aged father, just three months before his death.

Daughter Jennie M. Gaumer (1881- ? ) was born in June 1881 in Fogelsville, Upper Macungie Township, Lehigh County. She wedded Oliver Smith ( ? - ? ). Two offspring resulted from this union -- Margaret Smith and Anna Smith. The couple were in Fogelsville circa 1913-1938.

Son Horace Franklin Gaumer (1888-1896) was born in about 1888 in Fogelsville, Upper Macungie Township, Lehigh County. Grief swept over his family in the winter of 1896 when the nine-year-old boy contracted a severe cold followed by pneumonia and scarlet fever. He died after a brief struggle on Feb. 11, 1896. Burial was in St. John's Lutheran Church Cemetery. A short article printed in the Allentown Democrat said that the "funeral took place on Sunday week, and was attended by a large concourse of relatives and friends. The remains as they reposed in the coffin were literally covered with floral tokens of love from parents, sisters, brothers and friends. The departed was a member of Miss Sallie Villee's primary school, the second of her little flock to be taken away by death during the present term."

 

~ Son Benjamin Lewis Gaumer ~

Son Benjamin Lewis Gaumer (1844-1917) -- a.k.a. "Lewis B. Gaumer" -- was born on Nov. 22, 1844 in Upper Macungie Township. He stood 5 feet, 5¾ inches tall, with grey eyes and brown hair.

On Feb. 27, 1864, at the age of 20, he married Mary Ann Layton (1845-1895), a native of Schantz's Mills, PA.

Their children were Emma Amanda Esther Gaumer, Clinton L. Gaumer, Eleanore Lovina Schreiner and Annie Jane Victoria Gaumer, the youngest of whom died at the age of three. In the early 1860s, the Gaumers made their home at Fogelsville, Lehigh County.

Benjamin was drafted into the Union Army during the Civil War, joining the army at Allentown on Nov. 7, 1862 and then moving to Philadelphia. Among his fellow soldiers in the same company were his brother-in-law Charles L. Koch and cousin by marriage, Tilghman H. Beisel. Using the first name of "Lewis," he was placed into the 176th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company B. The Allentown Democrat once reported that he saw service at Fredericksville, Charlottesville and several other battles.

During the months of May and June 1863, he was treated for dysentery. He received his honorable discharge on Aug. 18, 1863.

After the war, he returned home to Upper Macungie Township and began raising a family. The Gaumers lived in Upper Macungie in 1870.

At some point, likely during the 1870s, Benjamin secured employment as a section foreman with the Central Railroad of New Jersey, and the family relocated into the city of Allentown. He worked for the railroad for decades, until retirement in about 1914.

Among his longtime friends was Tilghman H. Beisel of Allentown, husband of Benjamin's cousin Melinda Gaumer. They were members of the Bethany Evangelical Church, and Benjamin belonged to the Washington Chamber of the Order of th Knights of Friendship.

On Aug. 29, 1890, he was awarded a military pension as compensation for wartime ailments. [Invalid App. #976.794 0 Cert. #846.177].

Sadly, Mary Ann passed away in Allentown on Oct. 25, 1895.

Benjamin married for a second time, to Elizabeth Shaffer (Aug. 17, 1854-1925), daughter of Lavinous "Eli" and Julia (Barker) Shaffer. The nuptials were celebrated in Williamsport, Lycoming County, PA by the hand of Rev. Marion L. Firor of St. John's Reformed Church. Benjamin was age 52 at the time and Elizabeth 42. Elizabeth had been married and divorced from Edward Behringer (or "Baringer"), with the divorce decree made in 1890 in Williamsport.

When Elizabeth's mother died in February 1904, the Gaumers hosted the funeral services in their home. Benjamin is known to have attended the 50th wedding anniversary party for his brother and sister-in-law, Solomon and Anna "Maria" Caroline (Hartman) Gaumer, held at Dorney Park in August 1913.

In the summer of 1912, he grieved at the death of married daughter Emma Wilson, and then again the summer of 1914 endured the untimely death of son Clinton. Over the duration of his last years, Benjamin lived at 206 North Second Street in Allentown. His physician F.B. Schiner treated him for chronic rheumatism, heart disease, nervous prostration, kidney trouble, failing eyesight and congestion of the livery.

Burdened with diabetes and a case of bronchitis, he received additional medical care from W.J. Hertz, M.D. Benjamin died on June 1, 1917. Burial was in West End Cemetery, beside his first wife, as directed in his last will and testament. His brother Solomon attended the funeral and burial. An obituary in the Allentown Democrat noted that he left behind 11 grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. He also left funds to the orphans' home in Topton and to the West End Cemetery Association for perpetual care of the family graves.

As a widow, Elizabeth began receiving her husband's monthly pension payments. [Widow App. #1.103.776 - Cert. #846.305]. Her home address circa June 1917 was 206 North Second Street in Allentown. She became senile and died of heart issues at age 74 on Dec. 3, 1925. Her remains were buried in West End Cemetery.

Daughter Emma Amanda Esther Gaumer (1864-1912) was born on Oct. 9, 1864 in Upper Macungie Township. At the age of 15, in 1880, she and her brother both earned income working for a local woolen mill in Allentown. She was joined in marriage on Christmas Day 1883 with John H. Wilson ( ? -1904), a native of Easton, PA and the son of John B. Wilson. Their wedding was held at the home of Emma's parents and officiated by Rev. J.A. Feger, with the news announced in the Allentown Morning Call. The couple produced four children -- Claude B. Wilson, Ruth M. Burns, Edna R. Landmesser and Mary J. Wilson. In 1887, at the birth of daughter Ruth, they dwelled in Washington, NJ, but eventually returned to Allentown. They made a residence at 110 North Third Street in the First Ward circa 1898, and John made a living as a wholesale green grocery salesman for Gomery Bros. He also was a member of the James Allen Council of the Junior Order of United American Mechanics, Alexander Council of the D. of A. [Daughters of America?] and Allen Fire Company. Emma was a member of Christ Reformed Church. Heartache blanketed the family when John began to suffer from heart/pulmonary disease in the early 1900s. He bore the problem for several years. Evidence suggests that even though he was ailing, he attended the Firemen's Convention in October 1903, but after that was confined to bed. At the untimely age of 39, he died on Feb. 3, 1904. An obituary in the Allentown Leader said that "A large circle of friends mourn his death" and that among his survivors was a half-sister, Olada Gery. Funeral services were held at the Wilson home and at the Chew Street/Calvary Methodist Episcopal Church, with the remains places into rest at Greenwood Cemetery. Now widowed with four young children, Emma only lived for another eight years. At the age of 47, in 1912, Emma contracted a tuberculosis of her lungs. She lingered for several months, confined to bed for the final weeks at her father's home, at 206 North Second Street. Death swept her away on Aug. 9, 1912. "Impressive" funeral services were held in her father's home in Allentown, co-officiated by Rev. C.F. Althouse, of Christ Reformed Church, and Rev. H.H. Smith, pastor of Bethany United Evangelical Church, "attended by many sorrowing relatives and friends," reported the Morning. Call. "A quartet of members of Christ Reformed choir rendered several selections at the house and at the grave." Floral tributes ranged from a pillow inscribed "Mother" -- from the daughters -- and gladioli and asters from the extended family -- to roses from a friend and slumber robe from son Claude. Pallbearers included Leo Gaumer, nephew Raymond Gaumer, Russell Shriner and Russell Fink, with burial following in Greenwood Cemetery. An obituary appeared in the Leader. J.W. Burkholder of Allentown signed the death certificate.

  • Granddaughter Ruth M. Wilson (1887-1965) was born in about 1887 in Washington, NJ. She spent the majority of her life in Allentown. In Aug. 1907, the 20-year-old Ruth married Charles I. Burns ( ? -1962), son of James M. and Catherine (Fox) Burns. Their marriage license was announced on the pages of the Allentown Democrat. The couple lived in Allentown and produced two sons, Nevin Burns and Lynn Burns. Their home, shared with their son, was at 2011 South Carlisle Street. Charles made a living through emplyoment with Bee Inc. and retired in about 1946. The family were members of St. Peter's Lutheran Church, located at the corner of Chew Street and Ridge Avenue. They grieved in June 1951 at the death of their 42-year-old son Nevin who had married and relocated to Gunnison, CO. When celebrating their golden wedding anniversary in August 1957, they held an open house at their home for relatives and friends. The couple was pictured in a related story in the Allentown Morning Call, which noted that their granddaughter Marilyn and her husband William Druckenmiller resided in Japan, where he was serving with the U.S. Air Force. Sadly, Charles died at home at the age of 79 on Aug. 3, 1962. Ruth outlived him by three years and remained with her son in Allentown, at 2011 Cypress Avenue. She died at the age of 78 on Aug. 30, 1965. The Morning Call printed an obituary.
  • Grandson Claude B. Wilson (1889-1961) was born on Dec. 11, 1889 in Allentown. When he was about 23 years of age, in late December 1912, he was united in holy matrimony with Bessie E. Beck ( ? - ? ). They were the parents of two offspring, Claude B. Wilson Jr. and Joyce A. Hoover. Over the years, Claude taught vocational classes at Raub Junior High School (for 25 years) and later at Allen High. He was popularly known for playing Santa Claus for the Allentown Schoolmen's Club and as the costumed character of Uncle Sam, on stilts, performed during community parades. He also enjoyed singing as a tenor in the Lehigh Consistory Chorus and belonged to the local Masons lodge. Socially, Bessie was active with the Order of Eastern Star, Allentown Shrine, White Shrine of Jerusalem and Amaranth. During World War II, they worried as son Claude served as an Air Force pilot. After retirement in 1955, Claude earned extra income as a bank guard at Lehigh Valley Trust Company. He and Bessie were members of Grace Episcopal Church. The couple endured the untimely death of their son in 1951. They dwelled in 1957-1961 at 447 Linden Street in Allentown. When celebrating their 45th wedding anniversary, in December 1957, they held a buffet dinner party at their home, with a related story appearing in the Allentown Morning Call. At the age of 71, Claude suffered an embolism and acute heart attack in April 1961. He survived these but after a few months died at home on Sept. 21, 1961. Burial was in Greenwood Cemetery. He was pictured in an obituary in the Morning Call and survived by five grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.
  • Granddaughter Edna R. Wilson (1892-1966) was born on April 26, 1892. She wedded John F. Landmesser ( ? - ? ). The couple did not reproduce. Edna once resided at St. Johns, Butler Township, Luzerne County, and attended the local United Church of Christ and Lutheran Church. They are known to have been in Jeddo, Luzerne County, PA in 1961-1965, at the address of 12 Highland Street. Sadly, suffering from the affer-effects of a cerebral hemorrhage, Edna died as a patient in Hazleton State General Hospital on May 29, 1966. Rev. Harry G. Royer, of St. John's Reformed United Church of Christ, preached the funeral, with interment following in the church cemetery. Serving as pallbearers were William Shoemaker, William Rohland, Richard Allen, George Klingerman, Harold Cabey and Hugh Marley. The Hazleton (PA) Standard-Speaker ran an obituary.
  • Granddaughter Mary J. Wilson ( ? - ? )

Son Clinton Lewis Gaumer (1866-1914) was born on Sept. 9, 1866 in Upper Macungie Township, Lehigh County. As a young teenager, circa 1880, he went to work for a woolen mill in Allentown. He wedded Alice Kincade ( ? - ? ). They lived at 205 Bryan Street in Allentown. The couples' known offspring were Raymond A. Gaumer, Florence Armbruster and Jessie Dooren. Clinton supported the family through his work as a signalman on the Central Railroad. Suffering from heart valve disease, diagnosed in May 1914, he endured for only three months and died on Aug. 6, 1914, at the age of 47 years, 10 months and 27 days. Burial was in East End Cemetery.

  • Grandson Raymond A. Gaumer (1890-1964) was born in 1890. In 1909, at the age of 19, he wedded Helen Hickey ( ? - ? ). He was a 44-year railroad employee. In his free time, he served as president and financial secretary of the Riverside Drum and Bugle Corps.

Daughter Eleanore Lovina Gaumer (1870 -1955) was born in about 1870. In February 1890, when she would have been about 19 years of age, she married Elmer Schreiner ( ? -1951), son of Casper and Louise (Hoats) Schreiner and stepson of Ellen "Ella" (Biery) Schreiner. The couple bore three known children -- Russell L. Schreiner Sr., Stanley E. Schreiner and Louise M. Donschietz. They also adopted a fatherless grandson, Clinton D. Schreiner, born under the name "Boutiller." Allentown was their longtime home. Elmer was employed with Taylor Engineering Company, and socially he belonged to the Washington Chamber and Grand Lodge of the Knights of Friendship and the Orioles lodge. The Schreiners marked their 35th wedding anniversary in February 1925 with a dinner at their home, with daughter Louise playing piano and sons Stanley and Russell and son-in-law Edward Donschietz singing as a trio. In 1929, the Schreiners grieved when Elmer's father was kiilled in an automobile accident. Evidence hints that the couple separated in the early 1930s. Eleanore supported herself as a maid at Hotel Allen, retiring in 1935 at the age of 65. At that time, she lived with son Russell and pursued court-ordered financial support from her other three children at the sum of a dollar per week. She was a member of Grace Evangelical and Reformed Church and active in its Ladies Aid Society. In July 1940, Elmer was pictured in the Allentown Morning Call -- without Eleanore -- in a four-generation pose with daughter Louise Donschietz, grandson Clinton Schreiner and greatgranddaughter Kay Sandra Schreiner. Elmer died at the age of 83 at Sacret Heart Hospital on Feb. 13, 1951. His obituary did not name his wife. The widowed Eleanore dwelled with her son Russell at 741 South Eighth Street in Allentown. At the age of 85, on Nov. 8, 1955, she died in Allentown. Burial was in Fairview Cemetery. An obituary was published in the Morning Call.

  • Grandson Russell L. Schreiner Sr. (1896-1963) was born on May 12, 1896 in Allentown. He was married to Esther Moser (1897- ? ). They bore three children, Louise Hilda Mildred Schreiner, Eleanor Young and Russell L. Schreiner Jr. Russell made a living as a truck driver for Modern Transfer Company, with his career there lasting 34 years. They were members of Grace United Church of Christ. Heartbreak cascaded over the young family when infant daughter Louise died at the age of 26 days on Sept. 27, 1920. Funeral services for the little angel were held in the home of Russell's parents and burial in Greenwood Cemetery. Over the years -- caught in the marital dispute between his parents -- he alternately gave them a home in his residence. Mother Eleanore is known to have been there in 1935 and 1951 and father Elmer in 1940. Russell retired from Modern Transfer in May 1962. He only enjoyed retirement for about nine months before he became stricken with a bowel infarction and death swept him away at age 66 on Valentine's Day 1963. Interment was in Fairview Cemetery. The obituary for Russell was published in the Allentown Morning Call.
  • Grandson Stanley E. Schreiner (1897-1966) was born on Sept. 1, 1897 in Allentown. He was united in holy wedlock with Helen G. Joy ( ? -1995). They made a residence at 123 North Sixth Street and later at 543 Cleveland Street in Allentown and were members of St. Paul's Catholic Church. The couple's two daughters were Catherine E. Brong and H. Joy Miller. Stanley earned a living as a salesman with Wetherhold & Metzger Shoe Store and was pictured in the company's newspaper advertising. He retired in 1961 and afterward earned additional income through part-time employment with Matte Dress Factory. After suffering a heart attack, he died in Allentown Hospital just four days before Christmas in 1966. His remains were lowered into eternal rest in Fairview Cemetery.
  • Granddaughter Louise M. Schreiner (1901-1983) was born on March 9, 1901. As a teenager, circa 1916, she gave birth to a son, Clinton Boutiller. The boy legally was adopted at age seven by Louise's parents. A related story in the Allentown Morning Call said that "the whereabouts of the father is unknown." On Sept. 16, 1923, she wedded Edward Donschietz ( ? -1968), also spelled "Donshietz," son of Frank and Julia (Boder) Donschietz of Allentown. The children born to the couple were Geraldine Shatsky and Christine Mitchell. They made a residence in Allentown at 827 South 10th Street and later in the 1940s at 934 Wyoming Street. Edward was a self-employed barber for 38 years. His first shop was located at 19th and Wyoming Streets, which he maintained for more than three decades. Later, after moving to Wyoming Street location, he based the shop out of their home and called it the Wyoming Barber Shop. He was a member of St. Paul's Catholic Church. When the couple celebrated their silver wedding anniversary in 1948, an article was printed in the Morning Call. Edward became seriously ill at home and rushed to Allentown Osteopathic Hospital on May 17, 1968, where at age 65 he was pronounced dead on arrival. A funeral mass was sung in Edward's church, and the Morning Call ran an obituary. Louise lived for another 15 years. She died in July 1983.

 

Copyright 2000, 2015, 2016, 2018-2019 Mark A. Miner

Many thanks to Paula (Gaumer) Tooke, Stan Garmer and Dr. Phyllis M. Correa for so graciously sharing their research discoveries for this biography.